Posted on

will seeds blend in a coffee grinder marijuana

We’ve got more classic grinders too, including our own RQS branded metal grinder! That one even comes complete with a kief catcher, as does our pollinator grinder, which also has a handle on the outside for a low-effort grind.

An equally effective option, there’s no reason you can’t treat your favourite greens like the kind you eat. It’s also probably one of the simplest methods on the list. Throw your weed on the cutting board and dice it until you’ve got it at a ground, but not powdery, consistency.

Start off by taking the bigger buds and breaking them down into smaller, more manageable bits. From there, use your fingers and fingernails to whittle those down into even smaller bits until you’re satisfied.

Directions

• While not necessary, letting your nugs dry out for a bit will make this a much easier task.
• Make sure you watch your fingers, as the nugs may be quite small. Considering how light and uncompressed nugs can be, note that they’ll let the knife pass through easily.
• As was the case with the other methods, overkill is possible. Chop in moderation.
• Like you would after chopping anything else, clean your board and knife off afterwards.

Is it a little excessive? Sure. A little showy? Probably. But why not live life to the fullest? That, my friends, is why you should try grinding weed with a blender.

Credit cards are usually associated with preparing hard drugs, but we’re talking about strictly herbal use here! Credit cards are sturdy, easy to handle, and actually slice dried weed exceptionally well.

Watch your fingers! You’ll end up touching the sharp points sooner than you might realise.
• Almost any of the ends should work. However, give preference to ends with smaller openings, as that’ll give you the ideal consistency.
• You might have a hard time getting weed out of the crevices. Keep a poker around to dig through them and get all of your bud.
Wash off the grater thoroughly to make sure you get rid of the scent and residue.

Spices are the most flavorful and aromatic when freshly ground. If you don’t have a mortar and pestle, a coffee grinder stands in well as a spice grinder. I have used it to make Indian spice mixes, grind cloves or cardamom pods, and peppercorns, among other things.

Use your grinder for dried flower or spicy, warm potpourri, if you need somewhat smaller pieces to get an evenly distributed mix,

4. Small amounts of flour

Last week, Mindy shared some simple homemade gift ideas, including homemade tea blends. Definitely worth checking out!

Although my blender is my preferred appliance for finely grinding unrefined sugars to make my own powdered sugar, the coffee grinder will work in a pinch, when all you need is a little bit.

Want little bits of chocolate, coconut, orange or lemon peel, or other small edible bits to use as garnish? The coffee grinder can handle most of them.

If you’re dead set against getting an actual quality food processor like, say, the Hamilton Beach 70740 8-Cup Food Processor – which is, we might add, not much more expensive (maybe $10 more) than either a good coffee mill, mortar and pestle, or blade grinder – then we’ll do our best to direct you to a coffee grinder that can chop up a wide variety of food.

Oh, and if a spice has moisture – don’t even think about it! The moisture will rust your coffee grinder out (see more in the next section on food processors).

Lastly, here’s a video by Jamie Oliver showing proper mortar and pestle technique, and giving tips on how to maximize flavor.

What do we recommend?

Why is “better” in quotes like this? Well, for the same reason that grinding coffee is better with a manual mill or a burr grinder – it is less shocking on the substance being ground up, and, in many cases, this results in a better flavor. The quotes are because people can always debate this point.

Priced under $20, it is not going to break the bank and worth a shot for a lot of your grinding needs.

Next, we discuss whether you can grind rice in your coffee grinder.

Oh…you’re not going to take “no” for an answer, eh? Well then, the longer and more complicated answer is: well, kind of.