Posted on

when is the best time to start a marijuana seed

As roots develop, the stalk will rise and you’ll begin to see the first iconic fan leaves grow, at which point your cannabis plant can be considered a seedling.

Seed germination length: 3-10 days

What are a weed plant’s growth stages?

Marijuana light cycle: 16 hours a day

Generally speaking, it takes anywhere from 10-32 weeks, or about 3-8 months, to grow a weed plant from seed. It’ll be quicker if you start with a clone or an autoflower seed.

Marijuana light cycle: 12 hours a day

If you don’t like the idea of pre-soaking your soil, you can use a spray to moisten the holes before you plant each seed. With enough moisture surrounding your seeds, you can still encourage a root to develop.

After 3–5 days, the seeds will start to open, and you should see tiny white tips appear. Once these roots reach 2–3mm in length, use extreme care to transfer them from the water to pre-prepared soil pots.

Regardless of where you get your seeds from, it is best to give them a slight (and delicate) inspection before planting. Most of the time, all seeds will germinate; however, poor-quality seeds will produce a weaker plant. Unfortunately, that is something you will not find out until well into the vegetative and flowering stages.

WET KITCHEN TOWEL METHOD

Start by filling pots with a premium-quality soil that has been soaked in water. Many growers also choose to lace the water with a root stimulator. Make a hole roughly 10–15mm deep. This will be your seed’s new home. Remove the seeds from their packet and place them into the pre-dug holes. Loosely cover the seeds, but be careful not to compress the soil above the seed too much. The root will struggle to penetrate solid soil, slowing plant growth. Lightly spray the top of where you placed the seed so that your growing medium stays moist.

The dome of the plastic container will create your seeds’ own mini tropical climate. If you then place all the components in a temperature-controlled cupboard, you will have created a self-perpetuating supply of moisture—no need to touch the seeds again until they are ready to be transferred to your final growing medium as a young seedling. Using the stone wool block method, your seeds should germinate in one to two days.

Timescales can vary, as it all depends on how ideal your germination environment is (see the golden rules above). Even the worst grower could make a seed germinate, but it may take a few weeks and, of course, increases the risk of a weaker plant.

Probably one of the most common methods of germination. The kitchen towel method comes in several iterations. Some growers use cotton wool pads or absorbent pieces of paper. For this guide, we will be using kitchen towel as it is readily available and holds moisture relatively well.

Sometimes, it’s hard to know when it’s the best time to do it, and a very common mistake is to get carried away by the excitement of the moment and start germinating the seeds too early. Below, we give you key advice to determine the best moment depending on the region you live in. Practical and simple advice that will help you to choose the best date. Let’s get started.

Temperature changes can be fatal during the plant’s first stages; it’s weak and sensitive due to its small size, and if we don’t guarantee continuous hours of sunlight and good weather, they may not grow with the necessary vigour and can even die.

Advice nº1: control your eagerness

It was all a dream, an illusion; during the spring season the weather can often turn ugly, and one week later it’s pouring rain. Your plants, which have barely taken their first steps, are in a totally drenched substrate, the few roots they had managed to develop are submerged in water, the leaves don’t grow and the plant is blocked. In the case of autoflowering varieties, by the time the plant recovers its vigour, it’s too late, as their growth period only lasts a month (they start to flower starting on the 25th-28th day approximately) and the final result will be a disaster. In the best case scenario, you’ll have a very small plant that will yield very little and of poor quality. In the worst case scenario, it will die.

There’s a popular belief that the earlier you sow, the faster the process and the earlier the harvest. This is not true; planting earlier will not result in larger, better plants or earlier harvests. It’s a good idea to control your eagerness and patiently await the best moment, when the good weather settles in.

It’s very common to get carried away by excitement and the eagerness to start sowing. It’s normal, you’ve spent the whole winter awaiting this moment and now it’s here you can’t wait to start. This, precisely, is one of the most common mistakes in outdoor crops: sowing too early. The spring climate is very unstable and can get nasty; it’s important to pay attention.