Weed And Seed Home Depot

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Is your lawn looking run down from years of foot traffic? Reseeding it can breathe new life into it. Learn about the cost to reseed a lawn with our guide. See why DIY Lawn Fertilizer from Home Depot and Lowes vs Online Retailers are better and more cost effective per square foot than you might think! I am confused as to what type of  grass seeds to use. I purchased Scots sun /shade and deep shade type of seed from Home Depot, I seeded it just few …

How Much Does it Cost to Reseed a Lawn? (2022 Guide)

Wondering how much to budget for your lawn project? Our guide to the cost of reseeding a lawn breaks down average prices, cost factors, and the best lawn care services.

Reseeding a lawn is a great way to breathe new life into dead grass from years of foot traffic. Bare spots in your lawn can come from anywhere: from dogs running through your sprinkler system or kids playing football on your turf. If you’ve recently moved, you may need seed to care for your new lawn. Reseeding can make a drastic difference in your lawn’s appearance, but what is the average cost you can expect to pay?

The This Old House Reviews Team has researched the best lawn care services in the United States for this cost guide, including each provider’s reseeding services and pricing. Use this guide to learn the cost to reseed a lawn, plan your seeding project, and avoid unexpected expenses.

Cost to Reseed a Lawn

Overall, you can expect to pay $90-$180 per 1,000 square feet to hire a professional lawn care company to reseed your lawn. You may also take a DIY approach to reseeding your lawn. However, you should expect to pay $50-$100 for seed, and many home improvement stores like Home Depot or Lowes rent the required lawn seeding equipment for $80-$90 per day.

Cost to Reseed Lawn by Seed Type

Grass Type Cost per Pound
Bahia $9–$11
Bemuda $5–$7
Clover $4–$5
Fescue $3–$4
Kentucky bluegrass $12–$19

Cost to Reseed Lawn by Lawn Size

Lawn Size Average Reseeding Cost
1–1,000 square feet $90–$180
1,001–2,000 square feet $190–$340
2,001–3,000 square feet $300–$500
3,001–4,000 square feet $575–$720

What is Lawn Reseeding?

Lawn reseeding, sometimes called overseeding, is a simple method to jump-start new growth and thicken your lawn. You spread fresh grass seed over existing grass. You can fill in thin spots to achieve a green lawn without tearing up any turf or soil.

Early fall is an ideal time to spread new grass seed. Soil temperatures are still warm, which helps seed germination. Cooler air temperatures are also better for grass growth. There are fewer weeds in your lawn around this time of year, so all nutrients go straight to your grass.

Factors that Influence the Cost to Reseed a Lawn

Your yard is unique, and the cost of reseeding it can vary based on factors ranging from where you live to the type of grass in your yard. Planning around these details can make your lawn reseeding project much more cost-effective:

  • Size of your lawn: The larger your lawn, the higher your price. Most lawn care services charge based on the square footage of a lawn.
  • Seed type: The type of grass seed you need also influences the total cost of reseeding. Grass seed costs can vary significantly. For example, it is only $3 per pound for fescue grass seed, while Kentucky bluegrass seed costs $19 per pound.
  • Labor: The overall amount of labor required for your job will also influence the price. Labor costs might be higher if a lawn care provider removes large sections of dead grass lawn. On the other hand, labor costs might be lower if you only need to reseed a small area of your yard.
  • Location: In general, if you reside in a rural community, the cost of lawn-care services is lower than in busy urban areas. In addition, local taxes and business fees influence the cost of lawn reseeding and other lawn maintenance services.
  • Packages and plans: The cost of reseeding might decrease if you opt for a lawn care plan. You might sign up for a plan that includes fertilizing, aeration, and weed control. The exact amount you might save will vary according to the company and its promotions and packages.
  • Lawn quality: If your yard is significantly bare, your topsoil has lost nutrients, or your grass is fighting disease, you may need to take extra steps. Getting back to a healthy lawn may require laying sod or mulch, applying special treatments, and more.
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Recommended Lawn Care Services

Reseeding your lawn can be time-consuming and expensive. If you’d like professional help, consider one of our top-rated companies below to guide you through the reseeding process.

  • TruGreen: TruGreen services every state except for Alaska and Hawaii. TruGreen offers five annual plans with a la carte services, such as pest control. This allows you to customize your lawn care or reseeding with everything from fertilization to aeration. TruGreen’s plans range from $558–$890 per year as a national average.
  • Sunday:Sunday ships do-it-yourself lawn care straight to your door, from fertilizer to root protection for the winter months. The company also offers 5 grass seed blends for lawn reseeding. The company’s custom plans cost about $250 per year and ship in regular increments throughout your area’s growing season. Their customer service team can also advise you as you get back to a healthy lawn.
  • Lawnbright: Lawnbright is a DIY lawn care product subscription service. It focuses on products free of harsh chemicals and toxins to create a natural lawn. Lawnbright creates a custom plan for your lawn based on a soil test. Once your needs are understood, it sends along with easy-to-use products that attach directly to your hose. Its offerings include materials that help with reseeding. Lawnbright’s custom plans cost around $200 a year.

Local Lawn Care Services

While many customers are happy with a subscription box approach or nationally-known brands, others prefer to connect with providers and local branches directly in their area. If you are seeking a local lawn service for landscaping and reseeding, enter your information below to be contacted by a locally based company.

Frequently Asked Questions

How much does it cost to seed a new lawn?

The national average cost to seed a new lawn is between $90–$180 per 1,000 square feet of lawn. That adds up to $575–$855 on average. If the size of your yard is an acre or more, this number may be over $1,000.

How much does hydroseeding cost?

Hydroseeding costs between $500 and $4,000 to reseed your lawn. This process involves spraying a pressurized liquid mixture of water, fertilizer, grass seed, and mulch across your yard. It takes less time than traditional seeding but is more expensive.

Can I reseed my lawn myself?

Yes, you can reseed your own lawn. Just consider the amount of labor, and be sure to budget for equipment rental and seed costs before getting started. Every two to three years, you may also want to budget for any lawn aeration costs to break up the soil, about $15–$17 for every 1,000 square feet.

Our Rating Methodology

To provide readers with the most objective, accurate, and detailed recommendations, the This Old House Reviews Team continually researches lawn care service companies on the market. We take the following steps to obtain up-to-date information about the industry and each company we review:

  • Analyze more than 100 customer reviews from third-party review sites, such as Yelp, the Better Business Bureau (BBB), and Google Reviews, for each company
  • Secret-shop for lawn care plans and packages to get a sense of cost, offered services, and the overall shopping experience for prospective customers
  • Speak with representatives on the phone to simulate the customer service experience from each provider
  • Update information on a regular basis to ensure the most accurate information when plans or services change with each company

We use the data from our research to build an in-depth rating system that allows us to score lawn care providers on a 100-point scale. Here are the factors in our evaluation and their designated scores:

  • Plan options (30): As one of the most important factors for homeowners shopping for a lawn care service, this one is weighted heavily based on each company’s lawn coverage. Companies that offer more options, such as irrigation, weed control, seeding, and aeration services in addition to a general plan, score higher than others.
  • Trustworthiness (30): Each company’s reputation is another significant factor for homeowners to consider before signing up for a plan. We scored providers based on their BBB score, accreditation, and offered guarantees available with each purchase.
  • Additional Benefits (20): We gave extra points to companies that provide a few additional services and benefits with their offered plans, such as organic treatments, pest control services, and a mobile app for digital communication and plan management.
  • Customer Service (10): In this rating category, we awarded points to customer-focused lawn care service providers who offer weekend availability and easy communication through phones, online chats, and online resources.

Availability (10): We also scored companies based on their overall availability, rewarding those that are nationally available over local companies only operating in select cities or ZIP codes.

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To share feedback or ask a question about this article, send a note to our Reviews team at [email protected].

Weed And Seed Home Depot

DIY lawn care is actually much much cheaper than you think and today I’m going to talk through it when it comes to fertilizing your lawn and turning in double-dark green.

I’ve done posts like this before but it came up again recently when I was talking this weekend about the “Easiest Way To Get a Green Lawn, Fast.” In that video I talk about the 3 primary elements you want to look for in any fertilizer if you want to get your lawn green.

All 3 of those elements work directly with, on, or in chlorophyll. It just so happens that it’s chlorophyll that makes grass green. Push the chlorophyll and you push the color of the lawn, deeper, greener and even bluer. Check out the video here if you missed it.

In that video, I made a recommendation for those of you who don’t want to slog to the store and get fertilizer but would rather have something delivered right to your door. That product is 24-0-6 Flagship and it just so happens to have nice amounts of all 3 elements, and in some cases, those elements are in higher concentrations than anything found at your big box retailer anyway.

But why is the bag so expensive?
Answer: it isn’t when you break it down.

24-0-6 Flagship (with 3% Iron) and Bio-Nite™ – Granular Lawn Fertilizer is a 45lb bag and the cost is $55 delivered (includes shipping). So for sure, there is some shipping cost in there that takes the sticker price up some, but what I have done is formulated it to work REALLY well with a lower rate or what we call “fewer pounds on the ground.”

If you want to know the secret, that’s really it. I formulate my DIY lawn fertilizers to work VERY well at low rates. Throwing down less and getting the same results – let’s take a look.

Flagship DIY Granular Fertilizer: 45lbs

Application Rate: 3lbs/1,000 (this means you spread 3lbs of product across each 1,000 sq ft of lawn area)
Bag covers: 15,000 sq ft 45/3 = 15

So you can get 15,000 sq ft of coverage from just one bag. To find out how much this will cost you for a single application, you have to know your lawn size.

Don’t Let The Math Deter You!

If this is starting to get confusing, please DO NOT click away – instead, get yourself some DIY Yard Care training. I have helped thousands of DIYers learn how to care for their lawns by teaching them the basics of lawn care and a lot of that starts with things like understanding your lawn size, and learning the lay of your land.

Before buying any fertilizer, invest in yourself by getting some good training that will set you up for success now and in the future. It’s full video and audio training plus a forum where we answer your questions. I’ll teach you all about fertilizers, what they do and how to apply them and why. We talk about all grass types too. You also get your choice of my warm or cool season full e-guide at the end of the course.

It’s all there, and I know you’ll be more confident after completing this training. Sign up for Yard Care BootCamp here. It’s never too late to invest in yourself so you can translate the knowledge to your lawn.

If You Have a 5,000 Sq Ft Lawn

And we know that a bag of Flagship covers 15,000 sq ft, and you have a typical 5,000 sq ft lawn, then you can get 3 applications from one bag. At a cost of $55 for the bag, that means each application only costs you $18.33.

Not too expensive is it?

Now compare that to a bag of Scotts lawn food at the local Home Depot.

Can you see in the top right that this bag covers 5,000 sq ft? And what is the cost?
Answer: $18.48

Pretty much the same as you getting some Flagship from me and having it sent right to your door.

So far we know Flagship is slightly cheaper and for sure more convenient. But how do these ferts stack up when it comes to nutrients?

I’ll tell you now – both are going to turn your lawn green. There really isn’t a “bad” fertilizer. And any company that is going to take the time to get themselves into a Home Depot is going to make sure their stuff brings the green. Plus, we all know Scotts: your dad and grandad used their products and had an awesome lawn right?

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I can also tell you that Flagship works. My DIY friends all over FaceBook are posting results pics nearly everyday.

So how do these two stack up, side by side? Let’s look at the label:

The Scotts on the left has more nitrogen, that’s for sure. However, Flagship contains more potassium and more iron. Overall we can look at those as a wash.

Now the Scotts does have Sulfur and that is an important element, so I have to give them that one, but look at all the other minor nutrients that Flagship delivers for you.

Boron, Copper, Manganese, Molybdenum and Zinc. You will find those in short supply in many soil tests and here they are, riding along with the Nitrogen, Potassium and iron.

What About Bio-Nite?

Now, let’s look at one more differentiator and that’s the filler material. Truth be told, all fertilizers are actually mostly just “filler” material. There is only so much nutrient you can pack in before it becomes overkill so the rest is filler material to help make the fert easy to spread.

Most companies use something benign as their filler material – you could even say “useless” – and that’s ok. It’s just what is done.

With Flagship, however, I go a step further and add 10% of my filler as Bio-Nite. Bio-Nite is the Florida version of Milorganite and it contains additional slow release nutrients, including additional chelated iron, calcium and some other goodies. These are not claimed on the label because we use them as filler – but they are still there and they deliver the smell of success in the fert.

That smell of success is also great for building overall soil health because natural additives like biosolids (Bio-Nite is a biosolid) increase the soil’s overall carbon percentage. You don’t get that with the cheaper fillers used in the Scotts.

Lastly, there is the small business angle. Yard Mastery is now entering its third year in business my team and I work hard everyday to help our customers succeed while creating positive content for this community I have been building for more than a decade now. So let me once again say, “Thank you for supporting an American small business!”

I hope you’ve learned something here – even if you never buy fert from me, I hope you will take the thinking, approach and strategy I’ve taught you today and take better control of your budget as you continue on your DIY lawn care journey!

Scotts grass seeds from Home Depot?? #428890

I am confused as to what type of grass seeds to use. I purchased Scots sun /shade and deep shade type of seed from Home Depot, I seeded it just few days ago, then I read on the Internet, that the best grass for Portland in fall should be perennial rye grass?? Is this true?
If so where can I buy then such type of grass here?
Area I am talking about is my backyard on the north side of the house.

Multnomah County Oregon

Expert Response

The grass you planted should be fine. 100% Perennial ryegrass is not a good choice for a shady site which I assume you have since you bought both a sun and shade mix and a dense shade mix.

Also, your sun and shade mix has about 20% perennial ryegrass along with the fine fescue (20%) and Kentucky bluegrass (10%) and the coating (50%) in it and the dense shade mix is probably almost all fine fescue.

Lastly, the grasses we plant in Oregon do not persist very long before getting taken over by other grasses in the soil seed bank including annual bluegrass, bentgrass, velvet grass, and rough bluegrass.

In spite of this fact, you can still have a nice lawn if you mow it regularly, fertilize it 1 – 4 times per year depending on the site, grass type, and expectations, and irrigate it enough in the summer to maintain the stand. Note, the lawn doesn’t need to be lush green but even watering it every few weeks deeply will keep it alive (even if it’s brown) which will prevent weed encroachment.

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