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seeding marijuana transplant

You may need to transplant your weed plant a second or third time to maximize its growing potential. Always monitor plants for symptoms of distress or overcrowded roots.

When in doubt, always opt for slightly more space than needed. A plant tends to require 2 gallons of soil for every 12 inches of growth it achieves during the vegetative stage. Knowing the potential height of the strain you’re growing is helpful.

Most marijuana plants go through 1-2 transplants during their life but could have more. As an example, transplanting can happen from:

First transplant of a cannabis plant

A plant’s container will determine how much the roots can stretch out, and therefore how big your plant will get. A container that’s too small will stunt it.

Young plants sowed in small containers are usually ready to be transplanted after they’ve sprouted 4-5 sets of leaves, but keep in mind this may vary from strain to strain.

Medium-sized indoor cannabis plants tend to be fine in 5-gallon containers as a finishing pot. Large outdoor plants may require much bigger containers to reach their behemoth potential, sometimes up to 10- or 20-gallon pots.

A rootbound plant may also appear under-watered. If a plant requires watering more than once a day, it may need to get transplanted.

Roots grow in the dark. That’s why we advocate 18-6 or 20-4 over a nonstop 24-hour light cycle. High humidity, ideally around 70% RH, and temperatures in the 20–24°C range make for a perfect seedling habitat. A propagator, thermo-hygrometer, and a spray bottle of water are the tools to help you dial it in.

Rockwool cubes and blocks are made for hydroponic growers. Start your seedling in a small cube and it couldn’t be easier to transplant later. Simply cut a cube-sized chunk out of a larger block and insert. The process can be repeated with minimal stress to plants.

THE OPTIMAL CONDITIONS FOR SEEDLINGS

The right time to transplant your seedlings is just before they outgrow their current container. With cubes, you can see roots poking out telling you it’s time to pot up. When you start with a cup or small pot, you are relying on above-ground cues. Typically, when the set or sets of true leaves of the seedling have spread out to cover the circumference of the container, it’s time. Also, vertical growth will be an obvious indicator.

Many soil and coco growers use cups or small plastic pots as starter containers, typically, anywhere in size from 0.5–5l. Lightly fertilised soil mixed with perlite or coco coir mixed with 30–50% perlite are the most common blended media for seedlings. So long as the base of the container has plenty of drainage holes and the interior can hold the volume of medium required, it can serve as a starter pot. Don’t be afraid to improvise. Poke a few holes in the base of a paper coffee cup with a pin and it becomes a pot.

Next, make an impression in your large container with another small pot, or the one with the plant in it if you don’t have any others. Make this impression in the medium after you have watered it. This creates a perfect imprint for the transplant.