Posted on

outdoor marijuana from seed

You also want to consider privacy and security. A lot of people want to conceal their gardens from judgmental neighbors and potential thieves. Tall fences and large shrubs or trees are your best bet, unless you live in a secluded area. Also, most state laws require that you keep cannabis plants concealed from the street.

Sandy soil is easy to work, drains well, and warms quickly, but it doesn’t hold nutrients well, especially in rainy environments. You’ll want to dig large holes for your plants and add compost, peat moss, or coco coir, which will help bind the soil together.

Privacy and security

Roof: This can be great for sun but may have too much wind.

It’s crucial to have a good understanding of the climate in the area you’re going to grow. Cannabis is highly adaptable to various conditions, but it is susceptible in extreme weather.

Sustained temperatures above 85°F will cause your plants to stop growing, while continued temperatures below 55°F can cause damage and stunting to plants, even death.

Wilting plants and dry soil are a direct sign that the plants need water. Droopy leaves along with wet soil are a sign of overwatering. Both are common mistakes and can be corrected with some practice.

It is important to plan your planting schedule to ensure your plants are able to finish their flowering period before the cold, rainy fall weather is able to affect them.

The three primary nutrients that are required for cultivating marijuana are: nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium.

Watering and feeding plants

Avoid all-in-one fertilizers as they can be too high in nitrogen for the flowering cycle and damage any beneficial micro-organisms that may be present in the soil. It is suggested to choose a line of nutrients that is created specifically for cannabis, and to use its suggested feeding charts to avoid overfeeding or underfeeding. Organic sources of nutrients are usually preferred, as they are a great source of beneficial microbes, but may take longer to break down and become available to the plant. Both types of nutrients can be found in dry, pre-blended powders or liquid emulsions, but can also be made from scratch with the right ingredients. Organic compost tea, which includes nutrient rich ingredients, like molasses and earthworm casting compost, is a popular brew for outdoor cannabis farmers.

There are also many advantages and disadvantages of using clones. They can be found at your local dispensary, are from a proven genetic lineage, and typically do well outdoors, making them the perfect choice for inexperienced growers. On the other hand, clones develop a fibrous root system, as opposed to the deep taproots that are developed with seeds. Fibrous root systems can reduce their ability to deal with environmental stress and predatory insects.

During the vegetative phase, the plants need more nitrogen in order to create the roots and leaves that serve as the base for flowering. During the start of the flowering cycle, the plants will require more phosphorus and potassium than nitrogen. Towards the end of the flowering cycles, once the majority of the nitrogen has been depleted, the plants will focus their attention on using the remaining nutrients. The lack of nitrogen is largely responsible for the vibrant purple and orange hues that can be seen on large fan leaves and throughout the plants’ colas.

Greenhouses can be a great middle ground between the complexities of an indoor setup and the uncertainty of growing outdoors. They provide ample protection from the elements and use far fewer resources than an indoor grow. Greenhouses can be more costly than an outdoor garden and require more planning, but they also allow you to extend the growing season considerably.