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marijuana seeds wont germinate

Why are my seeds not germinating? With our germination troubleshooting guide, you can get to the bottom of why your weed seeds aren’t popping. Avoid these germination mistakes and get your grow off to a great start!

Do your due diligence and verify when local temperatures are high enough to set your plants outside. Usually, waiting a couple weeks for higher spring temperatures is worth it!

WHY YOUR CANNABIS SEEDS AREN’T GERMINATING

While tap water may be okay for more mature cannabis plants, it can be a problem for seeds and seedlings. Tap water contains chlorine, fluoride, and salts that can be detrimental to healthy growth and may even prevent seeds from sprouting altogether.

If you allow your seeds to germinate for too long, transplanting them safely will become difficult. The reason for this is that the longer the roots are exposed to air and light, the more likely they are to become damaged. Moreover, the longer the taproot, the higher the risk for accidental damage when transplanting.

To get your grow off to a great start, sourcing quality cannabis seeds is the best thing you can do. Not only will your germination rates be better, but your plants will also grow healthier with better yields at harvest time.

This is because when germinating directly in soil, the seed needs to both germinate and then be able to sprout and grow up past the dirt.

If you have a weed seed that is really flat and/or light green or super pale in color, it probably won’t ever germinate. Sometimes seeds are just no good. It happens and there is nothing you can do about this.

Remember guys, all seeds need to be germinated, not just weed seeds. Of course, in nature, this often happens on its own, but if you want to grow your own marijuana plants, you will to germinate them manually. Seed germination is the act of bringing the seed to life.

2. The Soil Has Mold, Fungus, or Insects

There is a really fine line here and it can be hard to gauge. It does somewhat depend on the quality of the seed in question.

If you are off by too much with either of these factors, the seeds aren’t going to pop open and come to life.

It probably won’t ever open up and sprout. However, on the off chance that it does still somehow germinate, it probably won’t live long enough to grow and sprout up past the surface of the soil.

Let’s take a closer look at this issue of your weed seeds not germinating. Why won’t my marijuana seeds germinate?

Seeds should ideally be planted within a year or two of purchase to ensure the best germination rate. The length of time before a seed is no longer viable can vary, but most seeds will still have at least a decent germination rate if they are stored properly and used within two to three years. The germination rate will decrease further with time. Proper storage means the seeds are kept in a cool, dark place and away from moisture until they will be planted.

Water only when needed. If the soil starts to feel dry, go ahead and water it to ensure there is water for the seeds. Never let the soil dry out completely before watering it again. If the soil still feels moist, there is enough water for the seeds, so wait another day or two to water. Keep a close eye on this during the summer months especially to ensure the soil doesn’t completely dry out during the hottest days.

Seeds should be planted soon after they’re purchased, but many people will order seeds early and wait to plant them. Depending on how long they wait, the seeds will likely be fine. However, seeds will become less likely to grow if they are stored for years before being planted. If you find old feminized weed seeds or other random unlabelled pot seeds in an old cupboard that have been stored for a significant amount of time, the germination rate simply isn’t going to be what it would be if the seeds were planted earlier. High-quality seeds can be stored longer, but still may not sprout.

What to Do About It

Marijuana Seeds should be not just be dropped in the soil and covered with just a light layer of soil on top of them. This not only welcomes seed-hungry pests like birds into yoru garden, but also doesn’t give you much control over the consistency of water and light that they are provided. You wan’t to mimic the conditions that nature provides for idea seed growth: moisture, warmth, and darkness.

The best option to protect seeds from pests is likely to germinate the seeds indoors. Once the seedlings are a couple of inches tall and they have their first set of true leaves, they can be transplanted in the garden and the birds will leave them alone other than to check and see if there are any bugs on the plants that they can eat. Another option is to use row covers. These can be inexpensively made and will cover the seeds completely until they start to grow. There are plenty of options for keeping birds away from the garden to protect the seeds, depending on what’s already on hand and what is more effective.

Always germinate your i49 seeds using our recommended germination methood. This will help give the seeds the best chance to grow. Indoors, the temperature can be more carefully controlled and once the seedlings are large enough and the temperature outside is warm enough, the plants can be transplanted to the outdoor garden.

Follow our i49 germination guide and sprout yoru seeds in a damp paper tower. This setup should be kept in a awarm and dark place like a cupboard inside your laundry room or in a box on top of your fridge. If possible some ventilation is helpful rather than a tightly enclosed space, and it is also a good idea to rinse yoru seeds periodically to prevent the development of mold. As soon as you see a taproot emerg, you can remove from the paper towel and transplant to a small amount of growth medium.