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marijuana seeds explained

Since I started growing cannabis nearly a decade ago, I’ve only grown with feminized seeds! I’ve never had a single plant that didn’t grow buds!

Having male plants can be an asset to a breeding program, but having to watch over and throw away half the plants can be a waste of time and space for growers who just want to grow their own supply of bud!

Cons of Feminized Seeds

Feminized cannabis seeds are produced in a way to make sure that all the resulting plants are female (since only female cannabis plants make buds).

Feminized Seeds Only Produce Female Plants

How Do Breeders Make Feminized Seeds?

“Regular” (or non-feminized) seeds will produce about half male, and half female plants.

Outdoors, planting your feminized cannabis in an optimal climate and during the right season is pivotal. Why? Because sunlight hours change depending on the season, and your plants need a specific schedule to thrive. To satisfy this need, you will usually want to plant them in spring (when there’s no frost) and harvest in fall.

To initiate flowering of feminized cannabis indoors, the grower will switch the lights to a 12/12 schedule. The longer dark period will simulate autumn conditions and trigger the plants to start flowering.

There is another, often unmentioned subspecies to consider called Cannabis ruderalis. Ruderalis strains are “weed-like” and grow wild in northern regions like Siberia. What’s interesting, though, is that ruderalis is naturally autoflowering. As a result, breeders can use ruderalis genetics to make autoflowering varieties of classic photoperiod strains.

INDOORS VS OUTDOORS

In the past, it was believed that cannabis’ effects were contingent on what family a strain belongs to—whether it is more indica or sativa. Indicas were thought to produce a heavy “stoned” feeling while sativas were said to produce an energising high better suited for the day. Recently, however, evidence is mounting that the effect of a given strain has more to do with the terpene profile of a strain—not the subspecies it belongs to.

What is known, though, is that terpenes (limonene, myrcene, pinene, etc.) give cannabis strains their distinct taste and aroma. They’re why one cannabis strain will smell fruity when another smells citrusy, floral, sour, or woody.

Most cannabis strains these days aren’t pure indicas or sativas. Rather, they are hybrids combining indica and sativa characteristics, and thus their growing characteristics vary.

• High amount of cannabinoids compared to male cannabis. Strains are often bred for maximum potency and aroma.
• Seeds are 99.9% feminized, so plants will almost always develop into females.
• No need to check sex of plants, and no need to discard male plants.
• Feminized strains are usually photoperiod strains, meaning they’re light cycle-dependent.