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marijuana seed development

Overwatering can also occur when a plant’s container is too big or too small. When growing a small seedling in a big pot, the excess soil can hold water for days in areas untouched by the plant’s roots. What you’re left with is a big container filled with wet soil that’s not only robbing your plant of oxygen, but also creating a breeding ground for fungi, bacteria, and pests.

Remember to be very gentle when handling your seedlings and transplanting them. Any minute damage to their roots can result in a ton of stress that, for such young and fragile plants, can take a while to recover from.

When it comes to picking pots, we recommend the following approaches for autoflowering and feminized seedlings.

GROWING SEEDLINGS OUTDOORS

When growing autoflowers, we recommend planting them directly in their final pots. Because of their short life cycle, it’s best to avoid putting autoflowering strains through any kind of unnecessary stress, including transplanting. While the exact pot size you use will vary depending on the strain you’re growing and the size of your grow space, most auto growers use pots between 5–15l.

Healthy cannabis plants look vibrant and green, and any sort of discoloration on a plant’s leaves or stems can be a sign of nutrient stress.

Growers usually run into nutrient burn when they feed their seedlings too early or when they transition into the vegetative phase (either because they transplant their seedlings into hot soil or they start feeding with a fertiliser that’s too strong). The first signs of nutrient burn are dark green leaves with burnt tips. Left untreated, nutrient burn also causes leaves to curl upwards.

Cannabis seedlings are super fragile and can easily “burn” in nutrient-rich soil. In general, we don’t recommend feeding during the seedling phase. Instead, keep your seedlings chilling in their Easy Start pots until they’re ready to be transplanted and start vegging.

Looking for shifts in trichome appearance is the most accurate way to determine the stage of maturity of your crop. Trichomes are hard to miss and appear as a white frosty substance that covers the buds and sugar leaves. Zooming in on these structures will allow you to know how far along your plants are, and whether they are ready for the chop.

The way these differ from photoperiod plants is written in the name. Regardless of whether you feel the plant is ready, it’ll start flowering at a certain time depending on the strain’s genetic programming. In one sense, these plants are easier for novice growers because there’s less to think about in regards to light coverage and cycle adjustment. On the other hand, due to the limited vegetation time, you have fewer opportunities for mistakes. This isn’t ideal for first-timers, but the fact that it only takes two months from germination to harvest is definitely appealing. Autos tend to produce lower, milder yields than their photoperiod counterparts, but modern advances are bridging the gap.

Another sign that your buds are maturing is when the pistils of the flowers change colour. Pistils are small-hair like structures that grow out of the calyxes, and are the reproductive organs of the female cannabis plant. They are the site where pollination occurs—if male pollen were allowed to land there. Pistils appear bright white during the early stage of the grow cycle, and eventually shift to an orange-brown colour.

STAGE 5: HARVEST, TRIMMING, DRYING AND CURING — 1–2 MONTHS

One of the best ways to truly tell if your flowers are ready for harvest is by getting up close and personal with a magnifying device. This visual advantage will enable you to detect minor changes that wouldn’t be noticeable to the naked eye. Some growers choose to use a jeweler’s loupe, which is essentially a pocket-sized magnifying glass encased in a piece of metal. Others choose to use devices such as digital microscopes, which provide greater detail.

It’s always best to evaluate if a cannabis plant is ready to harvest by taking a closer look at those resin dripping buds. Using an inexpensive scope to zoom in on those resin heads to make sure they are milky and amber rather than clear removes all the guess work.

You can trim your cannabis plants in one of two ways: wet or dry. Both have their own advantages, and each grower will differ in which one they prefer. Wet trimming refers to trimming off the sugar leaves surrounding the buds immediately after harvest while the plant still has a high water content and feels “wet”. This method is the most common, and arguably the easiest, as it doesn’t require a large room to dry out plants beforehand. However, wet trimming is literally sticky business. The resin from the flowers will cover both your hands and your scissors, but there is an upside to this. By scraping the resin from your scissors every now and then, you’ll quickly build up a supply of “scissor hash”, allowing you an early taste of your harvest.

Of course Autoflowering strains don’t follow the rules due to their Ruderalis genetics, so they will begin to bloom in about a month post-germination. Auto’s prefer to stay in 18+ hours of light for flowering and will be more productive on a light-dark cycle that would inhibit photoperiod strains from blooming at all.