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jiffy natural and organic seed starting mix marijuana

Coco coir unlike most soils for cannabis cultivation is unfertilsed. This is where hydro growers get to transfer their skill set. A light nutrient solution must be applied just like in a hydro crop from the beginning. The pH of your water will have to be adjusted to ensure you stay at the sweet spot for coco coir, namely a pH value of 6.0. In order to accurately keep the pH and nutrient solution dialled in, you have two options.

Watering and feeding cannabis plants cultivated in coco coir is a relatively simple transition for hydroponics growers and organic growers. Generally, hydroponic fertilisers perform better than most brands’ organic soil nutrients in coco coir. Specifically, coco specific nutrient ranges are worthy of consideration.

Growers need to properly prepare peat moss before adding it to a soil mix. The moss is known to be particularly resistant to absorbing water at first, and therefore needs to be well-moistened. To do so, place the desired amount into a deep tray. Spread the peat moss out across the tray and leave it exposed outdoors for several weeks. Allow dew and rainwater to soak the moss, but drain the tray as soon as the water begins to collect. If you live in a dry region, manually soak the moss before it dries out.

HOW TO GROW MARIJUANA IN COCO COIR

Low-grade coco coir bricks can sometimes be overdried. Occassionaly they can have odd sizes. Worse, some can be really tough to break down into usable growing medium. No matter how much water you add, bunk bricks won’t crumble easily.

Coco coir is the recycled and processed natural fibre from the husk of coconuts, grown mostly in India and Sri Lanka. What was once regarded as waste material, in contrast today constitutes a magnificent growing medium for cannabis plants both indoors and outdoors. With a pH of typically between 6.5-7.0, coco coir is comparable to unfertilised soil. Coco coir is available from most grow shops in 50l sacks. It’s sold just like soil. But usually more readily available in tightly compressed coco bricks.

Growing cannabis in soil alone offers good results, but soil amendments such as peat moss and coco coir can make good results great. They add structure, hold water, improve acidity, and boost microbial life.

In the last few years, most soil growers have begun blending coco coir into their own homemade super soils. Even the manufacturers of most common grow shop soils recommend buffering the substrate with coco coir these days. Coco coir drains better and keeps the roots oxygenated more than standard peat-based mediums. So you already have experience cropping in soil. Why not dabble with a soil and coco coir mix before making the switch?

Too dry
A certain amount of water is essential for germination, so maintaining constant soil moisture during the germination period is vital. Spray the soil surface with a fine mist, or cover containers with glass or a damp cloth to prevent your soil drying out. Make sure you remove the cloth once the shoot emerges.

When growing marijuana in the vegetative stage you may choose how long you wish to keep the lights on, as long as it’s 18 hours or more. The advantages are that plants will grow faster with 24 hours light, and a constant temperature is easier to maintain this way, something hugely beneficial to young seedlings. Disadvantages are that you’ll need to water more, of course, your lamps and ballasts don’t get a break, and the electricity bill increases.

Using the mister bottle, spray the freshly covered seeds until the mix is damp. Don’t pour water onto the pots as this can wash away the mix and expose seeds.

Lighting, temperature & humidity

The ‘Kiwiland Method’ for raising seed, has been developed from professional horticultural practices used the world over. We use it because it works, and it’s simple.

Wet thoroughly enough perlite to cover the bottom
of the propagator approximately 2cm deep. Plug the propagator, or heat pad, into the thermostat controller, plug the controller into the power and set for 23 C. Place the heat-sensing probe into the wet perlite just beneath where the seedlings roots will be. If using a heating pad lay it out beneath the propagator tray.

1. Propagator with bottom heat or
2. Heat pad + seed-tray
3. Thermostat controller
4. Soil thermometer
5. Perlite

Soil fungus
Seeds may rot, or the young seedlings may fall over. Overwatering, poor drainage and lack of aeration will increase the likelihood of this occurring. Plant seeds in sterilized potting mix, and make sure your containers are clean.