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is it illegal to buy marijuana seeds in texas

Unfortunately for opponents of marijuana, the law was somewhat vague about where to draw the line between industrial hemp and other forms of cannabis. Faced with an inability to test at the required level of precision, police chiefs and prosecutors statewide started declining to press charges against people caught possessing hemp-like substances.

While growing, possessing, and using marijuana in Texas is still prohibited by law, there are no such obstacles in the way of people who would like to buy seeds to have as souvenirs. It has never been easier for Texans to browse and purchase marijuana seeds from the comfort of home.

The Lone Star State is famed worldwide for its sprawling size and brash character. Texas is also a conservative place, though, especially outside of major cities like Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, and Austin.

Marijuana Seeds are Legal to Buy and Own Throughout Texas

Even if many residents of Texas are still committed to keeping marijuana illegal, things are starting to change. Hoping to help farmers throughout the state, for example, Texas legislators in 2019 passed a bill meant to legalize the cultivation and sale of hemp.

While things have been making a halting, mixed sort of progress on other fronts, the situation concerning marijuana seeds in Texas has not changed at all in recent years, and it has not had to. As in other states that do not specifically prohibit purchase or possession, it is entirely legal to buy and own marijuana seeds throughout Texas.

As a result, recent attempts to decriminalize or legalize marijuana in Texas have met with fairly stiff resistance. As far as pot fans are concerned, though, the situation is improving.

Fortunately, there are some convenient, reliable ways for Texans to buy many kinds of marijuana seeds. Some of the types that residents of the Lone Star State most often seek are:

In October 2014, Harris County Attorney Devon Anderson announced the First Chance Intervention Program, under which people with two ounces of cannabis or less could be offered a 90-day community service diversion program or drug education, instead of criminal prosecution and imprisonment. As of January 2016, the program was expanded to be mandatory for all law enforcement in the county.

However, penalties for marijuana possession remain high, so you have to question whether this is a risk you are willing to take. In Texas, state law currently permits prosecutors to press criminal charges, most often misdemeanors for small quantities, against users of recreational cannabis. Fines increase in terms of possession – the more cannabis, the higher the penalty. People can be easily fined more than $1000 with added jail time depending on the amount. Possession of fewer than 56 grams can be punished with six months in prison and a $2,000 fine. Several influential politicians are currently calling for reform of the marijuana law.

Medical cannabis in Texas

Fortunately, at least for them, the governor has now deviated from his tough anti-cannabis stance.

There are no separate growing laws in Texas. If you are found growing cannabis, it is classed as possession, unlike many other states, where growing laws carry separate penalties.

Cannabis oil has been legal since June 1, 2015, when Governor Greg Abbott signed the Texas Compassionate Use Act, which permits the use of low THC CBD oil to treat epilepsy in Texas. Abbott’s caveats his support: “I remain convinced that Texas should not legalize marijuana, it should only open the door to conventional marijuana for medicinal use. This followed a House of 96-34 vote on SB339.