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is buying marijuana seeds illegal in texas

While growing, possessing, and using marijuana in Texas is still prohibited by law, there are no such obstacles in the way of people who would like to buy seeds to have as souvenirs. It has never been easier for Texans to browse and purchase marijuana seeds from the comfort of home.

Unfortunately for opponents of marijuana, the law was somewhat vague about where to draw the line between industrial hemp and other forms of cannabis. Faced with an inability to test at the required level of precision, police chiefs and prosecutors statewide started declining to press charges against people caught possessing hemp-like substances.

The reason for this is simply that ungerminated marijuana seeds do not contain enough psychoactive THC to be considered drugs in their own right. Just like most other Americans, residents of Texas are therefore entitled to obtain and possess marijuana seeds for “souvenir purposes” or other personal reasons.

High-Quality Seeds are Readily Available

As a result, recent attempts to decriminalize or legalize marijuana in Texas have met with fairly stiff resistance. As far as pot fans are concerned, though, the situation is improving.

You might not know it from walking the laid-back streets of the capital city, Austin, but Texas is a politically conservative state. Although residents of the largest cities tend to lean leftwards, many millions who live in smaller towns keep the political balance tilted toward the right.

While things have been making a halting, mixed sort of progress on other fronts, the situation concerning marijuana seeds in Texas has not changed at all in recent years, and it has not had to. As in other states that do not specifically prohibit purchase or possession, it is entirely legal to buy and own marijuana seeds throughout Texas.

Whether for feminized, auto-flowering, or standard marijuana seeds, Texans have plenty of excellent options to consider. Some of the specific kinds of seeds that are most popular with buyers in the Lone Star State are:

However, penalties for marijuana possession remain high, so you have to question whether this is a risk you are willing to take. In Texas, state law currently permits prosecutors to press criminal charges, most often misdemeanors for small quantities, against users of recreational cannabis. Fines increase in terms of possession – the more cannabis, the higher the penalty. People can be easily fined more than $1000 with added jail time depending on the amount. Possession of fewer than 56 grams can be punished with six months in prison and a $2,000 fine. Several influential politicians are currently calling for reform of the marijuana law.

Although heads of state are pushing for lawsuits, some Texans believe decriminalizing marijuana is the answer. Austin City Council member Greg Casar announced that he had a proposal for the city of Austin to stop prosecuting low-intensity marijuana cases. Mayor Pro Tem Delia Garza, Councilor Natasha Harper-Madison and Councilor Jimmy Flannigan also support the proposal. On January 23, the proposal will be presented to the Austin City Council meeting as agenda item 59.

What about penalties?

Texas is often thought of as a hot country, associated with cacti and other desert-loving plants. However, its climate varies widely, from arid in the west to humid in the east. So what are the best varieties to try if you fancy growing some illicit weed – sorry hemp to treat epilepsy – in Texas?

This is a confusing time for people considering growing cannabis in Texas. There may well be further relaxation of the rules in the future. A recent poll suggested a majority of voters were in favor of marijuana legalization, especially for medicinal use.

In 2017, newly elected District Attorney Kim Ogg stated that Harris County would no longer jail people for cannabis possession offenses: “I never felt good to put marijuana users in cells. It’s just not fair, it doesn’t make sense, and our country is resounding against it.” Full decriminalization for possession of fewer than four ounces of cannabis began March 1, 2017, at no cost, ticketing, or criminal record.