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how to select marijuana seeds

Seeds that are not mature are typically small with a greenish hue and soft shell. Good, healthy seeds will be more greyish to brown with speckles and have a glossy appearance free from cracks. They are typically bigger in size as well. Seeds that are very dark or near black and appear to be dull may be old. To avoid immature seeds or aged seeds, try not to purchase seeds that have recently been harvested as well as those that have been kept in storage for long amounts of time.

There are all kinds of techniques people use when it comes to growing premium bud. Some people have their tried-and-true methods that they swear by while others are still in the trial-and-error period of their growing journey. Regardless of skill level, when it comes to growing a flourishing crop, the first place to begin when choosing to grow cannabis plants is with knowing how to properly select quality seeds.

Fresh seeds have a high germination rate that drops dramatically over time — from 90 percent down to 20 percent after three or four years. Excellent seeds are the cornerstone of successful plant growth because each one contains the genetic material that determines certain characteristics like size, shape and potency.

Deciding on a location for where the plants will grow make a huge difference in the success of failure of a crop. Seeds must be properly suited for the intended growing environment. There are benefits and drawbacks to both indoor and outdoor growing. Conditions for indoor plants are typically more temperate because they aren’t subject to fluctuating weather, but can be a financial burden due to high electricity bills from artificial lights. Growing plants outdoors helps cut costs by utilizing the sun as a free power source but leaves plants more susceptible to bugs and pests.

The strain of the seed determines what type of effects will be experienced after consumption. Indica and sativa are the two main strains that have distinct characteristic. Indica strains are known for their physical effects, with a noted body high and deep relaxation being the most commonly reported feelings, while sativas provide a cerebral buzz often associated with increased sensitivity to sights and sounds. Most seeds are hybrid strains that are either more indica-dominant or sativa-dominant.

One of the trickiest things about cannabis is that it’s hard to find the right combination of phytocannabinoids for the best high. Even scientists, with their years of research and expertise, can’t find the perfect combo. Why is this the case? In part, because each person is different, meaning the high can’t be externally quantified; it can only be described by the individual. This makes it hard to prove correlations between chemical combinations and high strength or type.

When it’s time to choose seeds, many are confused simply because they’ve never seen cannabis seeds in the past. There are three primary factors to consider when selecting seeds.

What is THC And Why Does it Matter?

With careful selection and genetic engineering, breeders could provide better alternatives. Some biotech firms and researchers are striving to replace plants with microorganisms that have been engineered to synthesize THC, CBD, and other cannabinoids. Others want to accelerate the cannabis plant’s chemical synthesis by genetically modifying cells to make THC from root to tip, increasing overall yield.

THC, which is shorthand for Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, is the chemical structure (phytocannabinoid) in cannabis that provides the high you get when you smoke, vape, or consume an edible. The term is somewhat misleading, though. Certain kinds of THC, such as Delta-8 tetrahydrocannabinol, are somewhat different from Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol. Furthermore, THC isn’t the only phytocannabinoid that bonds to your body’s endocannabinoid system to produce feelings of being high.

Cannabis is well known for its effects when smoked. But, where does the high come from, and how can growers ensure their crop is as high quality as possible? It all begins with seed selection. You’ll need to have a firm understanding of how to cultivate cannabis and which genetic qualities are most desirable.

Whether you choose to grow indoor or outdoor pretty much comes down to where you live, and whether you’re prepared to put in a little extra effort. In terms of making it easier for yourself, indoor is definitely the way to go. It allows you much greater control over the environment in which your plants are growing, but it does have drawbacks. Namely the initial cost of setting up, and the future costs of electricity and what your increased energy usage might be doing to the planet.

Armed with this information, you should now be able to make an informed decision about which seeds are right for you. But remember, this is just a guide, and will by no means guarantee success. You might also choose to ignore me, which is entirely up to you, especially if you have money to burn and a soft spot for American hybrids that cost a fortune and are only available as regulars.

So you’re new to growing cannabis? If you’re looking for your first strain, the choice can be overwhelming. Back in the day (or so I’m told) you had essentially two options – Skunk, or Northern Lights – but these days, things have moved on somewhat. There are a mind-blowing number of strains available, and many potential pitfalls that you, as a novice, are likely to run into. But with the right advice you should be able to avoid most if not all of them. Just remember, your first attempt will not be perfect. So don’t panic if and when something goes wrong.

Quality Autoflowering Strains

A third option is to go for autoflowering seeds. These are a relatively new phenomenon, and can be a great option for a novice grower as they combine pretty much everything you’re looking for in a plant – they’re usually fairly cheap, feminised, and indica dominant, and are extremely forgiving. They’ll grow pretty much anywhere, and quickly.

So keep it cheap, for now. Get a few practice runs under your belt and you’ll be moving on to the high grade in no time.

The downside is that the plants they produce will be smaller, and will therefore yield far less bud. Again, this does come down to personal preference. My advice would be that if you’re a recreational user experimenting with growing your own supply, autoflowers are a great place to start. But if you’re a medical user, or just need a large yield, they’re probably not for you.

This one is a little trickier, and depends on your circumstances to some extent. The accepted wisdom is that indicas are a safer bet for novice growers, due in large part to their shorter flowering time. When you’re new to the game, it can already seem like it takes forever to grow, harvest, dry, and cure your buds to a point where they’re ready to be consumed, so adding on the extra time needed for a sativa to flower is not generally considered a good idea. If nothing else, more time spent growing means more time for things to go wrong.