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how to plant marijuana seeds in a hydroponic system

When this happens the shell usually falls off on its own as the seedling grows!

I thought hydro plants liked it cold?

1.) Get Cannabis Seeds

If you haven’t put your hydroponic system together yet, now is the time! Make sure your pumps are all running, and that you’ve made a reservoir with seedling-strength nutrients. You need a home to put your new plants!

If there’s no germination at all…

Add your Rapid Rooter(s), and fill around the edges with extra clay pellets to hold each one in place.

Just like in soil or coco, cannabis plants in hydro grow fastest when it’s a little warm, around 75°F!

If deep water culture is the equivalent of growing cannabis plants in a pond, then the nutrient film technique is the equivalent of growing weed over a river. This system involves placing plants into a tube that is angled, so water can enter at one side and exit at the other via gravity. The roots grow down into the tube, where they are exposed to the flowing water. The water enters from a tank with an air stone and pump, and returns back once the cycle is complete.

You’ll need to constantly test the pH of the water to ensure an optimal growing environment. Nutrients are more available to plants when the environment is slightly more acidic. Therefore, a pH of 5.5–5.8 is required. Use a pH testing kit to take regular readings, and be sure to change the solution weekly to maintain this range. During flowering, a pH of 6 is preferred.

A wick system is a basic hydroponic setup that uses a growing tray similar to the drip system filled with clay pebbles. Under the tray is a tank of water, from which several wicks exit and enter the growing medium. Water travels up the wicks and passively hydrates the medium. No pump is required for this system.

3. PREPARE YOUR SYSTEM TO ENSURE A SUCCESSFUL GROW

Hydroponics is a method of cultivating plants, specifically cannabis in this case, in a solution of water and nutrients.

Below are two strains that we recommend for hydroponic growing.

Rockwool is another popular choice, and is a substance created using volcanic rocks with a wool texture, hence the name. Rockwool has a tremendous capacity to retain water, which allows for good hydration of the upper root system. Rockwool can be placed within a hydroponic basket, but can also be lodged directly into the top of a bucket or tank lid without.

Aeroponics is perhaps the most futuristic version of hydroponic growing, and uses misted water dispersed through the air to optimise aeration and hydration. Plants are placed into the top of a large tank of water filling the bottom 25%. Under the water is a pump that sends water into misters underneath the root systems. This fine mist constantly soaks the roots, allowing plants to receive massive quantities of air and water simultaneously.