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how to plant a marijuana seed outside

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Outdoor cultivators utilize the best mother nature has to offer in hopes of producing the best possible harvest. Many cannabis users agree that the best marijuana they’ve ever experienced has been grown outdoors under the full spectrum of natural sunlight. That unique spectrum creates a greater variance of cannabinoids and terpenes than artificial lighting, while indoor grows are often aimed at producing higher levels of THC, in particular.

Most cultivars will begin to flower once they receive fewer than 15 hours of sunlight per day. The latitude of your garden has a direct impact on how many hours a day your plants receive light.

How to grow marijuana outdoors

When growing outdoors, the sun’s full spectrum of light makes a world of difference. Each part of the light spectrum contributes to the growth and development of the molecules that make up the resulting plant, including terpenes and cannabinoids. Plus, without the constraints of ceiling height and indoor square footage, plants can really spread their wings, so to speak. Outdoor growers often choose this cultivation method in order to maximize natural light exposure and their yearly harvest.

Pests come in many forms, from large deer and gophers to small slugs and spider mites. Larger animals and pets can be kept out of the garden with fencing, while gopher wire beneath your soil beds can keep rats and gophers from eating the plants’ roots. Weeds will not damage cannabis, but they will compete for the nutrients in the soil and reduce the quality and yield of your crops. A light layer of mulch on top of your soil can prevent additional weeds from sprouting in the middle of your cycle.

It is important to plan your planting schedule to ensure your plants are able to finish their flowering period before the cold, rainy fall weather is able to affect them.

You can make this yourself by combining worm castings, bat guano, and other components with a good soil and letting it sit for a few weeks, or it can be purchased pre-made from a local nursery or grow shop.

In hot climates, sandy soil should be mulched to help with water retention and to keep roots from getting too hot.

Garden plot: Probably the most common outdoor growing spot, many will plant cannabis alongside other growing veggies.

Clay soils

Sandy soil is easy to work, drains well, and warms quickly, but it doesn’t hold nutrients well, especially in rainy environments. You’ll want to dig large holes for your plants and add compost, peat moss, or coco coir, which will help bind the soil together.

Most potting soils used in gardening are loam soils. If you’ve ever worked with potting soil, you’ll know that its composition is rich and diverse, and it looks dark and hearty. Beyond texture and color, the soil should smell rich and alive.

Roof: This can be great for sun but may have too much wind.

For most first-time gardeners, we recommend buying a quality potting soil that will provide your plants with enough nutrients to get them through most of their growth cycle without having to add many amendments. This pre-fertilized soil—often referred to as “super-soil”—that can grow cannabis plants from start to finish without any added nutrients if used correctly.