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how to make marijuana seed oil

Now that we have the sibling dynamic squared away, hemp seed oil has a huge list of benefits. In addition to its rich vitamins (D, B, and E), it’s packed with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Hemp seed oil is also an anti-inflammatory food, similar to turmeric. Thanks to the fatty acids in hemp seed oil, it’s helpful for skin conditions including acne and rosacea. An added bonus, if you need to polish things up around the house, is that a mixture of hemp seed oil with a tangerine essential oil can give your wooden furniture a refreshing treatment. It’s time to throw those not-so-eco-friendly, petroleum based products out the window.

Making your own hemp seed oil so you can avoid any additives that might come in a commercial product. This recipe from Hemp Seed Health is an easy, step by step guide on how to make it at home:

Hemp Seed Vs. CBD

With CBD oil steadily on the rise, it’s no surprise that hemp is getting a lot of attention. Hemp has a big reputation, and is usually used synonymously with marijuana. Though these two come from the same plant (think of them as really fun siblings, their mom being cannabis sativa), their uses are completely different.

Have extra hemp seeds left over? Here’s 15 different ways to snack on ’em.

So, cannabis sativa has two primary species (children). They’re hemp and marijuana. CBD, short for cannabidiol, uses the stalks, leaves, and other components of the cannabis plant to create an oil that relieves pain and calms anxiety, because we can all use a little bit more calm and less anxiety. Where it starts to get confusing is that hemp oil and CBD oil are often used interchangeably. Hemp seed oil comes from the seeds of the cannabis plant, and has another set of unique benefits. Both use a part of the cannabis plant that has very low (almost 0%) THC levels. Which is basically not even enough to get any kind of party started.

The cannabinoid compounds found in raw cannabis (THCA and CBDA) are not the same as those found in cannabis that has been heated – such as those inhaled (THC and CBD) when you ignite or vaporize cannabis, or when cooking with cannabis. The process of heating and “activating” cannabis is called decarboxylation. It is what makes cannabis psychoactive, and also more potent for medicinal applications.

Follow along with these step-by-step instructions to learn how to make homemade cannabis oil. We’ll also briefly discuss the science behind cannabis oil, and what types of cannabis to use to make oil. Finally, we’ll go over various ways to use homemade cannabis oil, including some notes about caution and dosing with edibles.

A wide variety of oils can be used to make cannabis oil. However, coconut oil and olive oil are the most popular and common. Coconut oil and olive oil are both pleasant-tasting and very nourishing for skin, making them versatile options for either medicated edibles or topical applications. Plus, they both have strong natural antifungal and antimicrobial properties. This helps prevent mold and extends the shelf life of your cannabis oil. Coconut oil is higher in saturated fat, which may bind fat-loving cannabinoids even more readily than olive oil.

Why Make Cannabis Oil

Generally speaking, THC is psychoactive and CBD is not. But THC does a lot more than change your state of mind! Studies show that THC has even stronger pain and stress-relieving properties than CBD, which is known to help with insomnia, seizures and inflammation. While they each have notable and distinct stand-alone benefits, an oil or salve containing both CBD and THC has the highest potential for a wide array of health benefits (albeit illegal in some places). Known as the “entourage effect”, the synergistic combination of both THC and CBD through whole-plant cannabis consumption and extracts is more powerful than either one on its own.

Your choice! You can make cannabis-infused oil with hemp or marijuana, depending on what is legal and available in your area. Or, what you’re desired end-results are. Hemp oil will only contain CBD (or a very minuscule amount of THC), while marijuana-infused oil will likely contain both THC and CBD. The ratio and concentration of THC and/or CBD depends on the strain of marijuana and particular plant it came from.

Cannabis oil is made by lightly heating (and thus infusing) cannabis in a “carrier oil”. Cannabinoids like CBD and THC, the most active components in cannabis, are both hydrophobic. That means they don’t like water, and are actually repelled by water molecules. On the flip side, CBD and THC are both fat-soluble. They like to bind with fatty acid molecules – such as those found in oil. When cannabis is steeped in oil, the THC and CBD molecules leave the buds or plant material and become one with the oil instead.

I personally like to use strains that are high in both THC and CBD to make oil and salves. To learn more about the differences between strains, CBD and THC, see this article: “Sativa, Indica & Autoflowers, the Differences Explained”.