Posted on

growing ungerminated marijuana seeds

In a last attempt to germinate your seeds, creating a small cut in the seed’s shell may help. However, this is no miracle cure, and you’ll need to be careful to avoid damaging the inside of your seed.

For long-term storage, it’s best to keep your seeds in a sealed container inside the fridge. Remember that opening the door of your fridge can actually cause some pretty dramatic temperature shifts. If you happen to have a second fridge that gets used less often than the one in your kitchen, use that one to store your seeds.

Older seeds often have an extra tough outer shell. Gently scratching this shell with some sandpaper can help moisture and warmth enter your seed at the time of germination. Try gently scarring your old cannabis seeds just before soaking to help them sprout.

KNOWING WHICH SEEDS TO PLANT AND WHICH TO STORE

Cannabis seeds, with their tough outer shell, seem pretty hardy. And while nature has definitely designed them to hold up to a wide variety of conditions, cannabis seeds aren’t invincible. Rapid changes in temperature and high humidity, for example, can quickly ruin a batch of seeds. Luckily, caring for your seeds is simple. Keep reading to learn how.

If your seeds get exposed to light or rapid changes in temperature, these conditions will trigger them to use up their nutrient stores before they ever see soil, meaning they won’t have the nutrients they need to germinate. High humidity, on the other hand, can trigger fungi to grow on your seeds.

We’ve all found an odd seed somewhere at the bottom of an old drawer or cupboard. Here are a few tips on how to germinate old cannabis seeds:

Yes, cannabis seeds can be stored in the freezer. The lower the temperature, the slower they decline. However, it’s usually not necessary to freeze your seeds. Meet the conditions we outlined above, and you should be able to preserve your seeds for up to five years and still get a high germination rate.

Use a spray bottle to moisten the paper towels and then store the cushioned seeds between two plates, under a face-down bowl, or gently place them in a plastic bag. Maintain a temperature of about 72 degrees Fahrenheit, keeping the paper towel wrapped seeds in the dark and away from a windowsill. In two to five days, the seeds will pop inside the paper towel sandwich and emit tiny roots, ready to plant when they reach about five millimeters in length.

The paper towel method also has its risk, as the fragile seedlings can be damaged during the potting process. The tiny roots can also get tangled in the paper towels, so make sure to move the seeds to potting soil before roots grow too long. Use your hands or tweezers to gently remove each seed from the paper towels and place them in a prepared growing medium.

First, make sure you use the correct type of soil, either gently fertilized potting soil or a seed starter with a pH level of approximately six (6). The soil contains the right acidity and enough nutrients to strengthen your young cannabis plants for the first two weeks. Be careful not to add more nutrients, or you risk overfeeding and killing your seeds.

Image lightbox

Germination itself is a crucial aspect of cannabis cultivation. The seed germination process is the foundation of every marijuana plant, and steps can be taken to boost successful popping. For example, some cultivators improve germination attempts by soaking seeds in 1% hydrogen peroxide or a compost tea for 12 hours beforehand to kill any dangerous pests.

While many plants can be germinated in the ground, cannabis seeds are fragile enough that you should germinate them before planting.

Whether you’re planning an indoor cultivation or outdoor grow, it’s best to germinate your seeds indoors. It’s easier to maintain proper temperature, light exposure, and moisture inside, and you can protect your seeds from the elements. Indoor germination, whether using soil or paper towels, will ensure your cannabis seeds have the best chance for survival.

Place the soil in a small pot and use your finger or a pencil to push a small hole in the dirt, a bit more than half an inch deep. Insert the seed into the hole and bury it with soil. From this point on, don’t touch your seed. The young plant is fragile and knows how to position itself in the soil bed.

Keeping the above in mind, seeds do need moisture to germinate. Keep your soil moist but not damp. The best approach is to use a hand sprayer with a fine mist setting. Use a transparent germination hood or cling film to keep the soil from drying out.

Handling your cannabis seeds with bare hands can contaminate them with all kinds of nasties like bacteria and fungus. Unfortunately, seeds and seedlings are especially vulnerable to these types of harmful pathogens.

If you’re germinating indoors and temperatures are too high, see whether you can get it cooler with some fans or by opening windows. If that doesn’t work, consider an air conditioner for your grow room to keep temperatures at bay.

8. DROWNING SEEDS

Unless you are using cuttings, growing weed starts with germinating your seeds. If your seeds don’t sprout, for whatever reason, your grow will be over before it even has a chance to start. But If you know the reasons behind germination problems, your chances of getting your grow off to a great start will greatly increase!

Solution: Only plant your seeds in a sterilised (i.e. new) potting mix as this won’t contain these harmful organisms. But your substrate isn’t the only thing you need to keep an eye on. You’ll also need to make sure your containers are clean, as these can also carry mould and other harmful pathogens. If you encounter fungus problems when you’re germinating, it is best to get rid of the seed and the contaminated growing medium and start over.

Seeds don’t need light to germinate. In fact, too much light can decrease their likelihood of popping. You only need to worry about providing light once your seedlings actually emerge from the soil. But make sure to start with low light intensity before gradually increasing over time.

Use bottled water for germination. If you need to use tap water, fill a bucket with hot water and let it sit outside for a day. This allows the chlorine to evaporate so the water is safer to use for germinating.