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growing marijuana seeds in rockwool

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Rockwool makes germinating cannabis seeds super easy. Moreover, it works well for hydroponic growers who want to use cuttings.

Rockwool offers a long list of benefits to cannabis growers. Not only does it prevent pathogens from multiplying, but it helps seeds germinate and facilitates good drainage.

Great for germination

Hydroponics

Rockwool also poses a potential health hazard to growers. New Rockwool cubes can contain a lot of loose fibres and dust. These particles can end up in the air, and even on your skin and in your eyes, mouth, and lungs. Much like asbestos, tiny fibres can build up in the lungs over time if you work with new Rockwool cubes every day.

However, healthy soil doesn’t just contain organic substances. Vital minerals and elements required by plants are inert by nature. Some of these are locked away inside of Rockwool and will eventually end up inside your cannabis plants, where they’ll enable and support key physiological functions.

Rockwool cubes are naturally alkaline. Because cannabis plants prefer slightly acidic soil, growers have to stabilise the pH of their cubes before sowing seeds (you’ll find out how to do this below).

Rockwool cubes are naturally alkaline. Because cannabis plants prefer slightly acidic soil, growers have to stabilise the pH of their cubes before sowing seeds (you’ll find out how to do this below).

Now, if you can, place them in a tray with a dome on it. This will help create a little humidity in there which seedlings like. This is not mandatory, but it helps. Whichever you choose, take your cubes and put them in a cool dark place, and leave them alone. The temperature should be roughly 68 degrees F, though my house stays at about 72 and they do fine there. I usually place them above my refrigerator and just leave them for a day or two. My lettuce seedlings sprouted with a quickness the last time I tried, and by the 3rdday they had grown so tall that I had to take the plastic dome off of my container because they were bumping up against the ceiling.

To accomplish this, use either Ph down chemicals, or lime juice (as it’s acidic). Add these to the water in small increments (VERY SMALL), and test the water to see where the Ph is. Continue doing this until you have a Ph of 5.5-6.

Now that we have the Ph adjusted water, it’s time to stabilize and hydrate the Rockwool cubes in it. Insert the Rockwool Cubes into your container and let them soak for roughly 1 hour. Once the hour is up, the cubes will be big and fat with water. Take them out of the bowl of water and put them somewhere you don’t mind getting a little wet. Save the remaining water for step 3.

Important: Do not let the PH of the water go below 5. A Ph this low will damage the fibers of the Rockwool Cube

They should look like this:

Get a bowl or some other container that is big enough to fill with water and have room left for your Rockwool cubes. Your average salad bowl will work fine for 3 Rockwool cubes, if you are planning on doing more than you will need a larger container.

Take 1-2 seeds and insert them carefully into the holes. Use a toothpick or similar object to push them down to the bottom, as you want them to be at the bottom of that hole. Rip or push a piece of the Rockwool over the hole (you don’t have to fill it completely), so that the seed can germinate in a dark moist environment.

Here is what it should look like: