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growing a white marijuana seed

The white color in cannabis occurs in nature occasionally, as a consequence of a double recessive gene responsible for the absence of chlorophyll or because of a genetic mutation of the genes involved in pigmentation.

Chlorophyll is the pigment responsible for giving color to plants. Its purpose, however, is more than aesthetic, as it is vital for the photosynthesis process. The chlorophyll of marijuana leaves is responsible for absorbing sunlight, triggering the chemical reaction that enables the plant to generate energy from carbon dioxide (CO₂) and the raw sap derived from water and mineral salts.

The pigment of white weed seeds

White weed seeds do not always occur because of a genetic trait, such as albinism. Instead, it can occur as a side effect of cross-breeding strains. Despite their color, white weeds seeds sold by seed banks are entirely healthy and develop in a normal way, offering bountiful harvests if grown in the right conditions. They are not true albino plants, and it is unlikely that albino plants would survive long enough to produce cannabis. Watch out if a strain of weed starts to turn white as this can be a sign of powdery mildew.

White weed is delicious, and often less intense than other varieties, so it is good for indoor or stealth grows. White strains are normally Indica-dominant and grow thick, bushy colas and have a rapid flowering phase. Even though most white strains are directly descended from White Widow, this isn’t always true – some white varieties are classed as White because of their high resin content.

White Widow is classed as relatively easy to grow, and she is very resistant to mold. You can grow White Widow in northern climates as she tends to grow similarly to an Indica, despite her Sativa-dominant genetics. Use techniques, such as topping, to allow light to reach all areas of the plant to maximize yields. Allow White Widow sufficient flowering time, and you’ll reap rich rewards!

Remember, just like animals and other living things, cannabis seeds are biologically different from one another (even if they are technically the same strain) and therefore will exhibit different physical characteristics. Don’t let these natural differences fool you into thinking that a larger, rounder, and darker seed (for example) is of better quality than a lighter, smaller, and more oval-shaped one.

This simple and cost-effective method is a great way to tell the good genetics from the bad; they will sink or swim, literally. Seeds that remain buoyant on the surface are more than likely of poor quality and are to be discarded. Seeds that sink to the bottom like a botanical cannonball are probably healthy and should be germinated.

Growing Seeds From A Bag (Bagseed)

Immature cannabis seeds, on the other hand, tend to be green and have a soft outer shell that breaks when any kind of pressure is applied to it.

Are your seeds light or dark in colour? Are they tough or do they turn to dust when you press them between your fingers? These are just some of the ways to tell if a seed is healthy and worth growing. Keep reading to learn more.

The fact that cannabis seeds can vary in appearance has led some growers to think that the size, shape, or color of a seed dictates its quality.

Remember, once a seed germinates, the real work begins. Sexing, selecting, vegetative growth, flowering, and the eventual harvest all lie ahead.

This is the beauty of seeds—often, you can tell which plants or genetics will thrive right from the get-go. This will help you determine which plants you want to take cuttings from for clones or for breeding if you want to create a seed bank of your own.

One drawback of clones is they need to be taken during the vegetative stage of a plant—flower is too late—so if you have a small setup with only one light, it can be hard to keep clones alive while flowering other plants, because the two need different amounts of light.

Time to germinate

Plants grown from seed can be more hearty as young plants when compared to clones, mainly because seeds have a strong taproot. You can plant seeds directly into an outdoor garden in early spring, even in cool, wet climates.

A couple big drawbacks, though: Autoflower strains are known for being less potent. Also, because they are small in stature, they usually don’t produce big yields.

To get the buds found in medical and recreational stores, female cannabis plants are grown in an environment without males—or the males are removed from the area before they release pollen—so the females don’t create seeds. Females can then focus their energies on producing buds and not seeds—this high-potency marijuana is traditionally known as “sinsemilla,” meaning “seedless.”

As we’ve mentioned, cannabis is a dioecious plant, meaning male and female reproductive organs appear on different plants.