Posted on

difference between black and white marijuana seeds

White weed seeds do not always occur because of a genetic trait, such as albinism. Instead, it can occur as a side effect of cross-breeding strains. Despite their color, white weeds seeds sold by seed banks are entirely healthy and develop in a normal way, offering bountiful harvests if grown in the right conditions. They are not true albino plants, and it is unlikely that albino plants would survive long enough to produce cannabis. Watch out if a strain of weed starts to turn white as this can be a sign of powdery mildew.

All types of cannabis, including white strains, are dioecious or unisexual plants, which means that they are capable of producing male and female flowers in various individuals. However, both types of flowers can be found in hermaphrodite plants. You can reduce the risk of males by choosing feminized seeds, and most white strains sold at weedseedexpress.com are feminized seeds.

FAQ about White weed seeds

The white color in cannabis occurs in nature occasionally, as a consequence of a double recessive gene responsible for the absence of chlorophyll or because of a genetic mutation of the genes involved in pigmentation.

Chlorophyll is the pigment responsible for giving color to plants. Its purpose, however, is more than aesthetic, as it is vital for the photosynthesis process. The chlorophyll of marijuana leaves is responsible for absorbing sunlight, triggering the chemical reaction that enables the plant to generate energy from carbon dioxide (CO₂) and the raw sap derived from water and mineral salts.

Many growers have heard the myth that white weed seeds are not as viable as black or brown seeds and are less likely to germinate. This is entirely untrue. At Weedseedsexpress, we have undertaken numerous germination tests and are completely confident in their quality. In fact, our test revealed that white seeds are more likely to germinate sooner than black seeds which has been confirmed by numerous of other seed banks

Unlike other agricultural crops (like vegetables, fruit, or grain), cannabis hasn’t undergone the vigorous breeding techniques that ensure a stable crop. This means that you’ll sometimes sow a pack of seeds technically labeled as the same “strain,” but may end up with very different looking plants. It also means that the individual seeds you buy from a seed bank can vary in appearance.

It’s important to only conduct this test if you are planning to germinate the seeds immediately afterwards. The viable seeds that sunk to the bottom of the glass will have taken in water, crossing the membrane of the seed and signalling that it’s time to come to life—activating germination.

Appearance And Feel – Checking The Color, Size, and Shape Of Your Seeds

Some smokers might be pleased to see some cannabis seeds in their bag, and might think themselves lucky. However, finding seeds in a bag is bad for various reasons. For one, this means the grower has messed up and allowed their female plants to be pollinated by an invading male. When flowers are pollinated, they stop producing THC-containing resin and divert their energy toward producing seeds. Secondly, the seeds will have added to the overall weight of the bag, which means less weed for your buck.

Keep in mind that the simple process of packaging and storing cannabis seeds can also affect their appearance. Abrupt changes in humidity, temperature, or light exposure can make some seeds appear darker or lighter than others, but ultimately have no effect on their quality.

The fact that cannabis seeds can vary in appearance has led some growers to think that the size, shape, or color of a seed dictates its quality.