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corriander seed vs marijuana seed

Sure we can argue whether sweet potatoes are tastier than russet or Yukon potatoes. I’m sure there are endless cookbooks describing the minute differences between these root vegetables versus those. Those aren’t what make headlines. Those are just flavors.

There would be peppery cilantro, cilantro that was bred with parsley, pure cilantro, Italian cilantro, cilantro extracts and cilantro oils. If cilantro had as many fans as marijuana and the growing was done at the same rate, people would start to tune out the varieties in cilantro and just label it all as one “thing”. My point is the vegetables and herbs that line our supermarkets have become so benign that we forget what genetic variation is. Sure a beet and a turnip taste different and look somewhat similar, but what’s the fuss? They both deliver vitamins and need a bit of salt and pepper. My point is that people don’t really care and place sanctions around something until its psychoactive/medicidinal properties become apparent to the user.

The WHO estimates that there are 147 million cannabis users globally. That’s somewhere in the ballpark of 2.5% of the world’s population. That figure is significantly less than what my guess would be at, but that is because I believe there are a lot of people that use cannabis and have to lie about it.

Headlines are made from the plants that make people feel feelings.

Are they telling the truth?

Regardless of the figure, one-hundred and something million people consume cannabis annually. If there were a hundred and forty million regular cilantro purchasers, think what the cilantro market would look like. Think of what the cilantro market would look like if the consumption of cilantro were made illegal, would those 140 million users stop?

The next time a cannabis user tells you that cannabis is “the most genetically modified plant” – really take the time to mull that over.

I think if you’d compare them side by side, you wouldn’t think so.

They’re not a perfect match, but Okra seeds are probably a bit closer to SMALL cannabis seeds in terms of overall size, shape, and weight, though they are typically fairly dark in color, nearly black.

I grow these all the time. Coriander (aka cilantro) seeds are super light in both weight and color, and have wrinkled surfaces. They also are used all by themselves as a spice and have a very distinctive smell.

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I grow these all the time. Coriander (aka cilantro) seeds are super light in both weight and color, and have wrinkled surfaces. They also are used all by themselves as a spice and have a very distinctive smell.

I think if you’d compare them side by side, you wouldn’t think so.

They’re not a perfect match, but Okra seeds are probably a bit closer to SMALL cannabis seeds in terms of overall size, shape, and weight, though they are typically fairly dark in color, nearly black.

Coriandrum sativum, commonly known as cilantro, coriander or Chinese parsley, is an annual plant that grows up to 50 cm in height without the need for a lot of care. It is famous for its aromatic properties and is used as a condiment in cooking.

As with parsley, the part of the coriander plant most used in cooking is the leaves. But, in contrast with parsley, which is often used to add a note of colour to dishes, coriander not only produces a visual effect but provides a really unique flavour. In fact, it is this peculiar taste that has turned coriander into a true culinary celebrity: everyone knows it and has followers and haters in equal measure.

Coriander: the flavour that leaves no one indifferent

You can also boil coriander in water and spray the resulting solution over your marijuana plants. This solution would then act as a natural pesticide.

Coriander tolerates poor substrates and low temperatures, although it struggles to grow in waterlogged soils and develops more easily in milder temperatures.

Those who do not enjoy the flavour of this aromatic plant usually say that dishes containing coriander taste like soap. On the other hand, those who discover the flavour of coriander and enjoy it start using it daily in their dishes. It is such a huge contrast between followers and haters that a scientific explanation has been looked for to explain this. It has been hypothesised that people with OR6A2 genes (almost 20% of the population) detest coriander.