Posted on

can you test positive for marijuana by eating hemp seeds

Lani Banner of The Vitamin Cottage says, “You can look at the back of the label for the symbol for the test pledge, this is where the companies pledge that they are testing all of their hemp seed products to ensure that it has undetectable levels of THC.”

Dr. Laura Bechtel revealed to us that the results were negative for THC. Bechtel says the lab does job drug testing on a routine basis and does not find THC traces in people who eat hemp as a health food but do not use marijuana and adds, “People have to realize it’s going to have to take a large amount of seeds, a bag of seeds or more to test positive.”

Lani Banner of The Vitamin Cottage explains, “It is a complete protein, contains all of the essential amino acids in the ratio that the human body requires.” But some worry hemp contains THC, found in marijuana which is in the same family of plants.

Experts say if you want to have confidence in what you’re buying, check the label every time. Since hemp seeds that are hulled lose their THC, make sure to buy seeds that are produced in Canada, where exported hemp products fall under tough standards.

Our subject was a mother of three who doesn’t want us to use her name, but agreed to take part in our test.

After eating a salad with three times the amount of hemp seeds usually found in packaged yogurt, our subject submitted a urine sample to the lab to begin the testing process, which was repeated twice.

DENVER — Forty percent of Americans buy organic foods, and one of the most popular items is hemp seeds. Controversy over whether hemp seeds can have the same effect as marijuana has some worried.

Commercially available snack bars and other foodstuffs prepared from pressed hemp seeds were ingested by volunteers. Urine specimens were collected for 24 h after ingestion of the foodstuffs containing hemp seeds and tested for marijuana using an EMIT immunoassay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Specimens from individuals who ate one hemp seed bar demonstrated little marijuana immunoreactivity, and only one specimen screened positive at a 20-ng/mL cutoff. Specimens from individuals who ate two hemp seed bars showed increased immunoreactivity, and five specimens screened positive at a 20-ng/mL cutoff. A single specimen yielded a quantitative GC-MS value (0.6 ng/mL), but it failed to meet reporting criteria. Several specimens from individuals who ate three cookies made from hemp seed flour and butter screened positive at both 50- and 20-ng/mL cutoffs. Two specimens produced quantitative GC-MS values (0.7 and 3.1 ng/mL), but they failed to meet reporting criteria. Several specimens also tested positive with an FDA-approved on-site marijuana-screening device. Hemp seeds similar to those used in the foodstuffs did not demonstrate the presence of marijuana when tested by GC-MS. In this study, ingestion of hemp seed food products resulted in urine specimens that screened positive for marijuana. No specimens gave a GC-MS quantitative value above the limit of detection for marijuana.