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A Case of Toxicity from Cannabidiol Gummy Ingestion This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, Overdosing on CBD is highly impropable, however, taking too much can cause adverse reactions and side effects. We answer all your questions. Many people find CBD so effective for pain, anxiety and other health issues that they’re tempted to take higher doses. Learn why that’s a mistake.

A Case of Toxicity from Cannabidiol Gummy Ingestion

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

A 56-year-old male with no known history of substance abuse and no known prior medical conditions presented via ambulance to the emergency department after being found by coworkers with bizarre behavior, vomiting, and slurred speech. He had legally purchased cannabidiol (CBD) gummies marketed for pain and anxiety relief at a gas station several hours prior. Vitals upon arrival were temperature 36.8 Celsius, heart rate (HR) 79, respiratory rate (RR) 12, blood pressure (BP) 113/60, and oxygen saturation (O2) of 84% on room air that improved upon arousal. Physical exam showed an obese man in no acute distress with a depressed level of consciousness but who awoke to painful stimuli. Neuro exam was significant for dysarthric, hypophonic speech. Labs were significant for a primary respiratory acidosis with concomitant mild lactic acid elevation, normal bicarbonate, and normal anion gap. A comprehensive urine toxicology screen including cannabis was negative. Vital signs three hours after presentation deteriorated, showing: HR 47, RR 8-12, BP 88/52, O2 78%. Electrocardiogram (EKG) revealed sinus bradycardia. The patient progressively became more obtunded and required constant stimuli in order to maintain a patent airway. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation was not administered due to persistent emesis.

The patient underwent supportive care with intravenous fluids, oxygen, anti-emetics, continuous stimulation, and close neurologic monitoring with full recovery by the following morning. Further, patient history revealed that he had consumed two packages of CBD gummies, totaling 370 mg total of CBD (serving size on the package was 30 mg). He felt the products were healthy and safe based on packaging and therefore did not believe they would have any adverse effects.

CBD is one of many cannabinoids found in marijuana and marijuana-derived products. It is generally considered safe unlike its more psychoactive counterpart, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which has been linked to seizures, respiratory depression, and cardiovascular complications. CBD has surged in popularity recently, being marketed in oils, capsules, and candies as a health supplement, claiming to treat a wide variety of medical conditions such as glaucoma, pain, and even having beneficial effects on cancer prevention. Most currently available studies do not look at isolated CBD nor their synthetic equivalents, and purity is not guaranteed, thus leading to unforeseen side effects and toxicities. Moreover, these compounds do not show on traditional toxicology screens, posing a diagnostic dilemma for physicians. This case of respiratory depression and cardiovascular compromise in a relatively healthy man is just one example of the importance of considering synthetic CBD toxicity in the differential diagnosis, as there is little data available for recognizing and treating this condition.

Introduction

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a rising trend in pop-culture. It can now be found in baked goods and candies, infused into coffees, and on the shelves of stores in cosmetics and oils. Benefits have been found for specific seizure disorders such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome; it is also being studied for its role in neuropathic pain [1-2]. The excitement over these treatments has spurred the production of a multitude of CBD-containing products that advertise a broad spectrum of clinical benefits such as improving arthritis-related pain, potential curative effects on cancers, to an overall improvement in well-being. While these claims are unfounded, the general consensus from the World Health Organization is that CBD is well-tolerated with a good safety profile [3]. This is a case report of a 56-year-old male who experienced significant neurologic, cardiovascular, and respiratory depression due to CBD product intoxication.

Case presentation

A 56-year-old male on no medications with no known history of substance abuse presented via ambulance to the emergency department after being found by coworkers with bizarre behavior, vomiting, and slurred speech. He had legally purchased “CBD gummies” marketed for pain and anxiety relief three hours prior to his presenting to the emergency department, hoping they would help relieve pain from a recent back injury (Figures ​ (Figures1, 1 , ​ ,2 2 ).

Bag of CBD gummies consumed by patient marketed as a healthy solution for pain relief. Per packaging, each gummy contained 15 mg CBD.

A second bag of CBD Gummies consumed by the patient and scanned into the chart upon arrival. Product reportedly contained 50 mg CBD, 44 mg B12, and 400 IU D3 per gummy.

Upon arrival, vital signs (VS) were significant for hypoxia which did improve upon arousal. [Table ​ [Table1 1 ]

Table 1

Initial Vital Signs
Temperature 36.8 degrees Celsius
Heart Rate 78 beats per minute
Respiratory Rate 12 breaths per minute
Blood Pressure 113/60
Oxygen Saturation 84% on room air

Physical exam showed an obese male in no acute distress with a depressed level of consciousness, but who awoke to painful stimuli. Neuro exam was significant for dysarthric, hypophonic speech. He was also noted to have non-bilious, non-bloody emesis intermittently. Arterial blood gas at that time showed a mild acute respiratory acidosis with normal anion gap, normal bicarbonate, and a mild lactic acid elevation (Table ​ (Table2 2 ).

Table 2

Arterial Blood Gas
pH 7.30
pCO2 50.4
pO2 83.3
Lactic Acid 2.4

Labs were obtained and were notable for leukocytosis and mildly elevated creatinine kinase (CK) and CKMB (Table ​ (Table3). 3 ). A comprehensive toxicology screen including cannabis was negative (Table ​ (Table4 4 ).

Table 3

WBC, white blood cell count; RBC, red blood cell count; Hb, hemoglobin; Hct: hematocrit; Na: sodium; K: potassium; Cl, chloride; CO2, bicarbonate; CK, creatinine kinase; CKMB, creatinine kinase-MB

(H) indicates an elevated level, (L) indicates a low level

Initial Laboratory Values
WBC (H) 17.8
RBC 4.65
Hb 14
Hct (L) 41.7
Platelets 208
Na 139
K 4.5
Cl 107
CO2 25
Anion Gap 7
CK (H) 341
Ca (L) 8.4
Serum Alcohol
Troponin
CKMB (H) 4.4

Table 4

AMPX, amphetamines; BAR20: barbiturates; BEN, benzodiazepines; CAN 50, cannabinoids; OPI, opioids; PCP, phencyclidine; COC, cocaine; METH, methamphetamine

Urine Drug Screen
AMPX Negative
BAR200 Negative
BEN Negative
CAN 50 Negative
OPI Negative
PCP Negative
COC Negative
METH Negative

He was admitted to the medical floor, and VS 3 hours after presentation deteriorated, showing bradycardia with a nadir HR of 47, bradypnea as low as 8, blood pressure of 88/52 mmHg, and oxygen saturation as low as 78%. EKG revealed sinus bradycardia (Figure ​ (Figure3). 3 ). Narcan was given multiple times without improvement. The patient progressively became more obtunded but was able to maintain a patent airway with intermittent, aggressive stimuli. He was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) for close monitoring and possible intubation. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation was not administered due to continued emesis.

The patient underwent supportive care with intravenous fluids, anti-emetics, oxygen via nasal cannula, and continuous aggressive stimuli. The following day, 18 hours after admission, the patient was fully alert, oriented, and VS showed signs of improvement (Figures ​ (Figures4 4 – ​ -6). 6 ). The patient recalled consuming 2 entire packages of CBD gummies, totaling 370 mg of CBD (serving size on the package was 30mg). He felt the products were safe based on packaging and ate them as he would eat any other candy, not believing they would have any adverse effects.

Significant bradycardia observed at approximately 3 hours after initial presentation with spontaneous recovery at approximately 26 hours.

Patient became hypotensive almost immediately after presentation which remained persistent until spontaneous recovery began to be seen at approximately 17 hours post-presentation with full recovery seen by the 26-hour period.

Upon presentation, the patient demonstrated some bradypnea which became more pronounced and persistent in the 9-21 hours after initial presentation. Again, spontaneous recovery occurred at approximately the 26-hour mark.

Discussion

This patient suffered neurologic and cardiopulmonary depression as a result of acute CBD intoxication. He was in his usual state of health prior to consuming two packs of CBD gummies. His heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure dropped abruptly shortly after presentation and then experienced spontaneous recovery around 18-26 hours later without any intervention other than supportive care. This pattern of onset and recovery is consistent with toxin ingestion presumably from the CBD gummies which was the only known variable compared with the patient’s typical routine. Due to the report given by his coworkers, it was initially suspected that CBD overdose was the cause for this intoxication, of which there are no known published cases. However, given the lack of regulation and heterogeneity of over-the-counter CBD products, it is unclear which substance or substances were to blame in this patient. Similar cases are likely to be seen as these products become more commercially available.

One such case published in the literature is that of a 9-year-old boy with history of medically refractory epilepsy, diabetes insipidus, hypothyroidism, hemiplegic cerebral palsy, arachnoid cyst resection, and hypothalamic hamartoma resection who experienced profound neurologic and respiratory depression after CBD oil ingestion. The patient was being administered 1 drop of CBD oil to the gums daily but had incidental ingestion of 5 mL on the day of presentation. Upon arrival to the emergency department, he was noted to by hypothermic with depressed mental status and Glasgow coma score of 4-5 as well as decreased respiratory drive, leading to intubation. Urine screening was notable for a metabolite of THC, but testing was not readily available for CBD nor for synthetic cannabinoids. Mass spectrometry analysis of samples of the CBD oil from the same batch showed differing amounts of both CBD and THC. While the patient recovered, the exact constituent which caused the clinical findings mentioned was not able to be established due to lack of consistent formulations, purity, and potency of the commercially available products [4].

When comparing the two cases, there are certain similarities and differences which are worth mentioning. The pediatric patient consumed CBD oil, whereas the 56-year-old man ingested CBD gummies. In both scenarios, more of the CBD-labeled product was consumed than was recommended, and both patients required short-term hospitalization. In the case of the pediatric patient, testing for urine THC metabolites was also available. Neither patient had access to point-of-care testing for CBD or synthetic cannabinoids.

The CBD industry is projected to reach sales of $23 billion by 2023 [5]. This surge is likely due to the excitement behind potentially new medical breakthroughs and the desire as a culture to shift towards therapies that are more “natural.” However, most products, such as the one purchased by this patient are unregulated. Products can contain varying amounts of CBD in addition to unstudied cannabinoids, THC, or toxins such as pesticides and heavy metals. A recent study found that only 31% of 84 CBD products sold online from 31 companies were labeled correctly regarding the concentration of CBD. Additionally, THC was found in 21% of samples among other cannabinoids [6].

With the lack of a known blood level at which CBD exhibits toxic effects and the possible contamination of the product with other cannabinoids and toxins, it is difficult to know whether this is a true CBD intoxication versus toxicity from one of the constituents found in the product. Contributing to this diagnostic dilemma is the fact that the majority of these products are synthetic which allows for a larger spectrum of cannabinoids and much higher concentrations than would be found in natural sources. Additionally, synthetic products do not appear on standard toxicology screening, as was the case in this patient [7] (Oral Presentation: Bass, DO, Jessica, Linz, MD, David. Hashing Out the Unknowns of the CBD Craze. 2019 SGIM Annual Meeting; 5/11/2019).

Conclusions

This is a case of profound neurologic, cardiac, and respiratory depression secondary to acute CBD product intoxication resulting in ICU admission. The patient’s lack of substance abuse history and unintentional overdose should raise concern for physicians as more people are consuming such products. The aggressive marketing of these products paired with the lack of regulation and quality control has the potential to cause a significant negative impact on public health. Clinicians should be aware of this when prompted for advice from patients as well as when treating patients with potential intoxication. Further research into these compounds is certainly indicated and regulation may be warranted for consumer protection.

Notes

The content published in Cureus is the result of clinical experience and/or research by independent individuals or organizations. Cureus is not responsible for the scientific accuracy or reliability of data or conclusions published herein. All content published within Cureus is intended only for educational, research and reference purposes. Additionally, articles published within Cureus should not be deemed a suitable substitute for the advice of a qualified health care professional. Do not disregard or avoid professional medical advice due to content published within Cureus.

Can You Overdose on CBD?

According to current drug experts and top CBD researchers in the United States, the answer is no. With CBD being the rage across the nation, the question, “can you overdose on CBD” arises often. This is often due to the number of news stories reported about THC overdose and emergency room visits in America.[1] Still, unlike THC, taking too much CBD does not get you high or cause an overdose. However, it may cause side effects if you take too much.

The main active compound in cannabis used to get people high is Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Reported studies have disclosed that hemp-derived CBD products contain less than .03 percent THC; therefore, overdosing on CBD is highly unlikely. Although CBD products (cannabidiol CBD) show therapeutic promise for many, more research on humans’ effects still needs FDA approval.[2]

To discover the potential overdosing effects of CBD on humans who take too much, keep reading to see what is possible and currently known about people who overdose on CBD.

Can You Overdose on CBD Products With THC?

No, not necessarily because CBD products can contain a maximum of 0.3% THC since the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill, allowing CBD products to be sold and shipped across the nation if it meets certain criteria. One of which is the THC potency in the products.

Can there be side effects if you take too much? Yes, that is possible, but if you plan to take less than 100mg at once, you don’t have anything to worry about. Still, no one really needs 100mg of CBD to take at once.

If you’re talking about cannabis products that are high in THC, then there is a possibility you can overdose or cause you to end up in the emergency room. THC is the cannabinoid that can cause adverse reactions such as anxiety or panic attacks and a faster heart rate.

Broad-Spectrum CBD

If you’re worried about consuming CBD products that may have too much THC levels, then we recommend going with Broad Spectrum CBD products as they are THC-Free.

Other types of CBD products are Full Spectrum, which contains up to 0.3% THC, or CBD Isolate, which is also THC-Free. However, CBD Isolate does not contain other essential compounds such as other cannabinoids and terpenes.

Proper Dosage of CBD Oil

CBD oil’s proper dosage varies from person to person as everyone’s body reacts differently to CBD. We dive deep into the specifics in our CBD dosing guide, but we always recommend people to start low and go up.

We don’t recommend starting low and going up because of side effects, but because it’s all about finding the optimal dose. If you have a light to medium case, we recommend starting with 10mg to 20mg of CBD for the first 3-5 days. See how CBD makes you feel after you take it. Are you calmer and more relaxed? Are you sleeping much easier and getting better quality sleep? Or do you simply not feel it enough?

If you feel it great, then you’re probably taking the optimal dose that your body needs. If you don’t feel it much, increase your dose by 5mg to 10mg every 2-3 days. If you come to the point that you don’t feel CBD’s effects the same, then your body built a tolerance, and you should take a 3-5 day break or cut your dose in half, so your tolerance levels reset.

The image you see below shows a clear representation of why we tell people to start low and go up. This is called the Biphasic Effect, meaning that the effects don’t necessarily improve as the dose increases.

Symptoms and Signs of Overdosing on CBD

Although rare, an overdose of CBD may still be possible, especially if the product is mislabeled. Many factors impact overdosing like the amount of CBD dose, first-time use, use of a contaminated CBD product, body weight, expired CBD, and more.

Symptoms and signs of CBD overdose may include:

  • Panic attacks or extreme anxiety.
  • Psychotic reactions where one becomes paranoid or loses touch with reality or becomes paranoid.
  • Decreased coordination, judgment, perception, leading to injuries or even death.
  • Chest pain, a fast heart rate, or heart attack.
  • Uncontrollable seizures or shaking.
  • Unresponsiveness or delusional effect.
  • The pale skin color on the body.
  • Sudden high blood pressure with a headache.

For an accidental CBD overdose due to mislabeled CBD, get help by calling 911 or go to the closest emergency room for immediate help.

What Does the FDA Say About CBD Overdose?

The only CBD drug approved and evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) is called Epidiolex, which is used to treat two rare forms of epilepsy.[3] Therefore, all other CBD products are not designed to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

7 Frequently Asked Questions About CBD

If you’ve never used CBD, it’s wise to find out everything you can before taking your first dose. Whether you’re worried about side effects or concerned about building a tolerance to cannabidiol, you can rest assured that someone else has shared your concerns in the past. You can use the answers below to make a more informed decision about whether it’s right for you or not?

#1: Can You Overdose on CBD Oil?

If you buy a high-quality brand name CBD oil, the odds that it could cause an overdose are almost nonexistent. However, the first time you consume contaminated CBD oil, depending on the ingredients used, it could cause an overdose on CBD oil.

#2: Can CBD Make You Sick?

In short, the answer is yes. To avoid the effects of feeling sick, make sure to check the expiration date of the CBD oil. Expired CBD oil can make you sick; therefore, to get maximum health benefits and avoid bad CBD oil’s ill effects, always buy CBD from a reputable vendor.

#3: Can CBD Oil Kill You?

If you take too much CBD, there’s a chance you may wind up experiencing unpleasant side effects and harm to your liver, but it won’t kill you. There have been no studies showing that taking CBD at any dose could be fatal to date. However, since the Food and Drug Administration does not regulate cannabis sales, you could wind up with tainted products if you aren’t careful, which could be dangerous.

#4: What to Do if You’ve Had Too Much CBD?

The first thing to do is remind yourself that there is no chance of a cannabis overdose becoming fatal. The side effects of taking too much hemp-based CBD are less severe than those associated with marijuana. You should stay hydrated, make yourself comfortable, and let some time pass to feel better.

If you feel very unpleasant effects, then we highly recommend that you reach out to your doctor, call 911, or have someone take you to the emergency room to get checked up.

#5: Can You Build a Tolerance to CBD Oil?

Yes, you certainly can build a tolerance to CBD, and it’s quite common, especially to those who think consuming more will be more effective. Above in the CBD dosing section, we talked about the Biphasic Effect of CBD and explained how when you take too much, you may not feel CBD the same as before. That’s because you simply built a tolerance for CBD.

How to reset your tolerance levels, so CBD works as it did before?

We recommend taking a 3-5 day break from consuming any CBD to reset it and starting back at a lower dose fully. If you really want to continue taking CBD, then just cut your dose in half and wait for the effects of CBD to come back. However, the best option would be to take a minimum of 1-2 days off CBD and start back at a lower dose.

#6: How Much is Too Much CBD?

The average person doesn’t have to worry about taking too much CBD? Although there is no study conducted on “how much CBD is too much,” anything over 100-200mg of CBD is unnecessary. As we mentioned above, after a certain point, your body builds a tolerance and doesn’t produce the same effects.

Most people start with low doses of CBD, usually between 10mg and 20mg per day, and slowly increase them. Since it’s rare for even large amounts of CBD to cause side effects, it’s a safe way to find your lowest effective dose.

#7: Where to Buy Lab-Tested CBD?

There are a lot of companies and places where you can purchase lab-tested CBD products. A great place to start is a nearby CBD shop, but before heading over, make sure the people who run the place are highly educated about CBD and not selling only their own branded products.

Or you can purchase from a reputable company like Colorado Botanicals where we have a reputation for integrity and transparency. Our products are first tested in-house after each batch using the same chromatography machines licensed third-party labs have, and then we send it to a lab to get an honest, non-biased, transparent third-party lab report.

The Bottom Line

The odds of you overdosing on CBD products are improbable, even taking very high doses. However, consuming too much and going overboard can cause adverse reactions, including liver damage. So start at a low dose of 10mg to 20mg in a day and see how your body reacts to CBD. If you have a more serious case, then, by all means, you can start at a higher dose.

Don’t forget, more does not mean more effective! It’s all about finding your optimal dosage.

Another important point to always remember is to always purchase from a reputable company to avoid an expired or contaminated CBD product.

Can You Overdose on CBD?

Cannabidiol (CBD) oil is growing in popularity, mostly due to recent legalization and its frequently touted effectiveness in treating common ailments. CBD is used as treatment for a wide range of illnesses and ailments. Unfortunately, most people are unaware of which dose is best. The responsible use of CBD oil to achieve the best possible results requires awareness of its composition and proper dosage so that too much CBD is not ingested.

Can You Overdose on CBD?

The answer to this question is likely a version of “yes,” although an overdose is not life-threatening as it can be with other substances. It is estimated that an average male who weighs 180 lbs would need to ingest more than 33 tablespoons of CBD oil in one sitting to qualify as “overdosing” on CBD. As further perspective, a typical dose is 1/8 of a teaspoon.

That said, while it may be hard to overdose on CBD, this should not be misconstrued as meaning that high amounts of CBD are somehow harmless. (After all, as with any medicinal substance, the packaging directions regarding recommended dosage are not arbitrary: They are there for a reason.) If you experience severe effects after taking an inordinate amount of CBD, seek immediate medical attention.

Anyone who regularly uses CBD for pain or other issues needs to know they are taking a correct and safe, therapeutic dose of CBD, based on factors such as:

  • Body and Weight. Appropriate CBD levels are partly based on metabolism and body weight.
  • Biphasic Action. Lower doses of CBD have certain effects and higher doses have other effects. It is important to consider what ailments the CBD is intended to treat to identify the correct dosage.
  • Form of CBD. The most common form is CBD oil or tincture, but other forms such as gummies and vape juice are also used. Dosage depends on the form of CBD consumed.

The Effects CBD Can Have on the Body

Although CBD is one of 100 chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant, it is not psychoactive, like THC. This quality makes CBD a promising option for chronic pain relief and anxiety. CBD works by changing the receptor activity of the body’s endocannabinoid system (ECS), which regulates functions such as sleep, pain response, and the immune system.

Does Taking More CBD Reduce Anxiety Even More?

Anxiety and depression are devastating mental health disorders that are all too common. People who have sought treatment for anxiety but are not comfortable with pharmaceutical drugs have turned to CBD oil as a promising treatment. CBD has also been used to treat addiction.

A Brazilian study set out to measure anxiety levels when 57 men received either oral CBD or a placebo— 90 minutes before participating in a simulated public speaking contest. The results revealed that a 300-mg dose of CBD significantly reduced the men’s anxiety. Interestingly, both the placebo, a 150-mg dose of CBD, and a 600-mg-larger dose of CBD had little to no effect on anxiety.

This study and others like it reveal that more is not necessarily better when it comes to CBD. Identifying the proper dose is imperative for achieving the desired results. Different individuals can react to different doses in varying ways.

CBD and Pets

While there is no definitive research that shows how CBD affects dogs and other pets, pet owners have plenty of anecdotal evidence based on treating their animals for pain, seizures, and even depression. The AKC Canine Health Foundation is currently sponsoring research into the effects of CBD for treating epilepsy in dogs and is hopeful that beneficial discoveries will come of this effort.

CBD Is Becoming Popular for Pets – Why and How It Works

CBD works the same on a dog’s ECS as it does on a human. Pet owners who have struggled to find a viable remedy for their pets’ ailments have turned to CBD. Although the safety and risks of using CBD for dogs have not been researched, it is known to have the following side effects:

  • Dry mouth. CBD decreases the production of saliva which causes increased thirst.
  • Lowered blood pressure. Temporary drops in blood pressure can occur when doses are too high.
  • Drowsiness. The calming effect of CBD helps with anxiety but can also cause drowsiness.

Can Pets OD on CBD?

A commonly asked question is “What happens if my dog eats CBD?” The truth is that the safety and risks associated with dogs ingesting CBD have not been researched. The FDA has not approved CBD for dogs, so there is no regulated dosing. It’s not known exactly how much CBD is toxic for dogs. If a dog accidentally ingests any amount of CBD oil, it is best to seek treatment from a vet.

CBD and Children

Parents will go above and beyond for their children, especially when their children are in pain or suffering from other ailments. Although some doctors recommend CBD oil for children, citing numerous benefits, it is important to understand that a child’s body can react differently to a substance that works well for an adult.

Not only are dosages different to account for a child’s smaller and less developed body, but the manner in which CBD is ingested is different as well. Children obviously will not be vaping or dabbing CBD concentrates, so other methods of ingestion, such as gummies or placing CBD oil under the tongue are necessary.

If your child has consumed too much CBD and you are concerned, contact poison control immediately. CBD is a legal compound that can be toxic in large doses, similar to soap or toothpaste. Erring on the side of safety is best, especially considering that there is still much to learn about the potentially harmful properties of CBD taken in high quantities.

How Long Do the Effects of CBD Take to Wear Off?

The answer to this question depends on many factors such as the dose and a person’s metabolism. In general, it can take 5-20 minutes for the effects of CBD to manifest and these can last 2-4 hours. A big factor affecting how long CBD’s effects last is the method of ingestion and whether a CBD user ingests edible gummies, a capsule, a tincture, or a food product laced with CBD. Vaping, the most common way to consume CBD, begins to work within five minutes, but also subsides fairly quickly. The effects of topical CBD can take longer to kick in but also tend to last longer.

CBD oil has been studied for its potential role in easing symptoms of many common health issues in adults, including anxiety, depression, acne and heart disease. However, not much research exists addressing the toxicity of CBD or whether adults, children, or pets can overdose on CBD. Research on the potential health benefits and risks of CBD oil is ongoing. While CBD is generally regarded as a safe and effective way to manage pain and anxiety, CBD is still a medicinal substance that should be taken according to the dosing instructions on the packaging label.

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