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can you get high from smoking marijuana seeds

Long-term effects of smoking weed seeds are even worse! Marijuana seeds produce carcinogenic chemicals and toxins which can damage your respiratory system.

So you’ve talked yourself out of the horrible idea of smoking cannabis seeds and now you’re wondering what to do with them?

What to do with cannabis seeds?

You can get creative and use your weed seeds in other ways, but smoking them is a bad idea!

Despite being void in THC and CBD content, cannabis seeds are rich in amino acids, potassium, iron, zinc, magnesium, and vitamin A.

Marijuana seeds have little to no THC and CBD content which are the chemical compounds in marijuana flowers and buds that are responsible for having a mind-altering effect on you and getting you buzzed. Additionally, cannabis seeds create sharp crackling and popping sounds when they are smoked, which contributes to an incredibly uncomfortable smoking session. Plus, smoking cannabis seeds and stems will be harsh on your lungs and irritate the body’s airways, even if you are a chronic smoker.

Long-term marijuana use has been linked to mental illness in some people, such as:

Marijuana use may have a wide range of effects, both physical and mental.

Legalization of marijuana for medical use or adult recreational use in a growing number of states may affect these views. Read more about marijuana as medicine in our DrugFacts: Marijuana as Medicine.

Are there effects of inhaling secondhand marijuana smoke?

People can mix marijuana in food (edibles), such as brownies, cookies, or candy, or brew it as a tea. A newly popular method of use is smoking or eating different forms of THC-rich resins (see “Marijuana Extracts”).

In another recent study on twins, those who used marijuana showed a significant decline in general knowledge and in verbal ability (equivalent to 4 IQ points) between the preteen years and early adulthood, but no predictable difference was found between twins when one used marijuana and the other didn’t. This suggests that the IQ decline in marijuana users may be caused by something other than marijuana, such as shared familial factors (e.g., genetics, family environment). 6 NIDA’s Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, a major longitudinal study, is tracking a large sample of young Americans from late childhood to early adulthood to help clarify how and to what extent marijuana and other substances, alone and in combination, affect adolescent brain development. Read more about the ABCD study on our Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD Study) webpage.

While it’s possible to fail a drug test after inhaling secondhand marijuana smoke, it’s unlikely. Studies show that very little THC is released in the air when a person exhales. Research findings suggest that, unless people are in an enclosed room, breathing in lots of smoke for hours at close range, they aren’t likely to fail a drug test. 15,16 Even if some THC was found in the blood, it wouldn’t be enough to fail a test.

THC acts on specific brain cell receptors that ordinarily react to natural THC-like chemicals. These natural chemicals play a role in normal brain development and function.