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best way to start a marijuana plant from a seed

Raising a seedling, however, requires some patience, gentle hands, and a smidgen of luck. Thankfully pot seeds are remarkably vigorous because they are what’s called endosperm seeds, which means they have almost pre-formed cotyledon leaves before you even add water. Below is a brief guide on the techniques we have found yield the most success when starting seeds and raising your seedling to a healthy plant ready for transplanting.

The first set of leaves to come above ground are called the cotyledons. These little leaves are packed with energy and will grow to about 1/4 in in size before eventually falling off. Your second leaves to emerge will be single blades and look like regular pot leaves.

“Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.”

What are some of the best practices for planting marijuana seeds?

Ready to start growing, see what a Pot for Pot has to offer!

Cultivating marijuana plants from a seed rather than a clone can be quite exhausting since it requires a lot of care for the plants to germinate. There are some good practices that you should undertake before planting a seed to ensure maximum germination. First, you should start by soaking your seeds in container containing lukewarm water in a dark environment for 12-24 hours. Soaking the seeds accelerates germination by softening the outer shell. During planting, use seedling pallets soaked in water for 10 minutes. Place the seeds in a small hole ¼ in deep and then gently cover with dirt from the pallet.

Within a week or so you should see a seedling begin to grow from the soil.

One way to avoid sexing plants is to buy feminized seeds (more below), which ensures every seed you plant will be a bud-producing female.

It’s important to keep the delicate seed sterile, so don’t touch the seed or taproot as it begins to split.

Step 3

These are referred to as “bagseeds” and whether or not you can grow one will depend on where it came from.

Plants grown from seed can be more hearty as young plants when compared to clones, mainly because seeds have a strong taproot. You can plant seeds directly into an outdoor garden in early spring, even in cool, wet climates.

Autoflowers can be started in early spring and will flower during the longest days of summer, taking advantage of high quality light to get bigger yields. Or, if you get a late start in the growing season, you can start autoflowers in May or June and harvest in the fall.

One drawback of clones is they need to be taken during the vegetative stage of a plant—flower is too late—so if you have a small setup with only one light, it can be hard to keep clones alive while flowering other plants, because the two need different amounts of light.