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aren’t hemp seeds just marijuana seeds

Q: Is It Safe to Buy Seeds Online?

Despite this, experts still advise customers against requesting expedited delivery or a shipping method that requires a signature. This helps avoid drawing attention to the package or being forced to sign for the delivery.

Cons

The purpose of this review is to lay out the details of the top seed banks online.

QCS has been supplying Canada and the rest of the world with great seeds for two decades, and their website has been active for 15 years. Choose from regular or special edition seeds, outdoor, indoor, feminized, autoflower, and much more.

A: Each state has their own laws regarding marijuana seeds, so most seed banks use an old souvenir law to get over the legal hurdles and do their business. As long as the seeds aren’t germinated they are free to mail them to you as a souvenir or for bird food/fish bait. Go to any major seed bank’s website such as ILGM and you will see a disclaimer page that announces this.

Delivery is free for bulk orders, while standard shipping is around $6.25. It normally takes around one to two weeks. Payment options include check, Bitcoin, bank wire, cash, debit and credit cards. Bitcoin users receive a 15 percent discount.

If you count yourself among the confused, fear not—the time for clarity has arrived. We’re here to delve into the relationship between cannabis and hemp. But before we get our answers, we’ll need to ask some questions.

Are hemp plants just cannabis plants that happen to have less THC? Again, the reality is more complicated. Hemp plants, especially those grown for industrial purposes, tend to look, grow, and act differently than marijuana plants. Marijuana plants tend to be short and “stalky”, with lots of branches and a profusion of small leaves and heavy buds. Industrial hemp plants tend to be taller with skinny leaves, thick stems, and fewer branches.

WHAT IS THE TRUE DISTINCTION BETWEEN HEMP AND CANNABIS?

Hemp and cannabis are legally defined by the concentration of THC present in the plant. In the US and Canada, hemp is defined as cannabis plants with THC levels of under 0.3%. In the EU, hemp is defined as cannabis plants with under 0.2% THC. Many European companies aren’t thrilled about this difference; in fact, the European Industrial Hemp Association (EIHA) has called for these rates to be standardised to ensure fair competition.

So, are the first two hemp, and the third cannabis? Not quite. It’s more accurate to say that numbers one and two tend to be hemp, while number three tends to be cannabis.

If hemp is high in CBD, does that mean that hemp oil is CBD oil? It actually doesn’t. Hemp oil is cold-pressed from cannabis seeds, while CBD oil—or any cannabinoid oil—must be extracted from the flowers. Hemp oil doesn’t contain CBD, but it’s still special—it contains the golden 3:1 ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids, a combination that fights inflammation and helps build your brain. It’s also high in vitamin E, which has been shown to have anti-ageing properties.

But there’s something many people just can’t get over: hemp’s link to marijuana.

For one, the marijuana plant is stalkier, while the hemp plant is taller and thinner. But more importantly, the hemp plant contains low levels (less than 0.3 percent) of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of Cannabis Sativa. Marijuana can contain anywhere from 5 to 30 percent.

What are hemp seeds, actually?

Here’s where the confusion comes from: The hemp plant looks a bit like the marijuana plant and it actually come from the same plant species, Cannabis Sativa L, but there are major differences between the two.

Hemp seeds are cultivated from the hemp plant, which is grown predominantly for its seeds and fibers.

They also won’t cause you to fail a drug test. We know that other foods like poppy seeds, which contain trace amounts of opiates, can make you fail a drug test. Certain places actually ask that you don’t eat poppy seed bagels or muffins before testing. But hemp seeds won’t cause the same confusion. A study found that eating hemp seeds had little effect on a person’s THC levels ― and never enough to exceed the levels looked for in federal drug testing programs.