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are marijuana seeds ok in old plastic pots

In short, it’s important to know what you’re actually growing. When you get your seeds from a reliable source such as Royal Queen Seeds, you’ll have peace of mind in what it is you’re about to grow. You’ll be informed on your strain’s expected flowering period, nutritional requirements, yields, and other important information. This is essential if you want to grow successfully!

As an alternative to plastic pots, you can also use fabric pots (smart pots) or air pots. If you want to learn more about the different pots used to grow cannabis, check our article on the subject.

2. BAD GERMINATION

Without light, weed plants die extremely quickly. They depend on light to create vital carbohydrates, which are required as an energy source. As photons hit their leaves, small organelles known as chloroplasts convert light into energy-rich sugars.

Correct pH levels

Most cannabis soils, with the exception of special soil mixes used for propagation and seedlings, are pre-fertilised. This way, you won’t have to administer nutrients until several weeks into the grow. In fact, you may only need to feed nutrients when your plants start to flower. If for some reason your growing medium isn’t pre-fertilised, you will have to give nutrients to your plants from the beginning.

However, over time seeds lose their germinating power. This means that, after a few years, when farmers prepare to plant them, they run into problems getting them to sprout. To prevent this from happening, and to once again enjoy that cannabis you found worth storing, there are a number of tricks.

For those beginning with the glass of water, the second step would be to move the seeds, after 24 hours, to the wet paper towels. Germination normally takes between 48 and 72 hours, and, in the case of old seeds, can last up to 5 or 6 days, or even weeks. Therefore, transferring the seeds to wet paper gives you more peace of mind, as you are dealing with less water and, if they open, they will not quickly drown.

The key: the storage conditions

For example, you can scrape off the outer layer of the seed with a little sandpaper, creating micro-abrasions that should let some water in. So you don’t overdo it with this scraping we have a little trick: roll up a piece of very fine sandpaper, with the rough side on the interior, and secure it with tape. Place the seeds inside and cover the openings with your hands. Then just shake it for a couple of minutes and the sandpaper will do its job. Another more risky option is to use a knife to cut the seed transversely, ever so slightly, which will help the water penetrate the shell.

There are growers who prefer their seeds to germinate directly in the soil. In this case, in addition to ensuring that you have light and well-nourished soil, you can choose to dilute 10 ml (a teaspoon) of fulvic acid per litre of water, and use it to water the site where you have planted the seed. Another option is to use slightly carbonated water, as the additional CO2 will help the liquid penetrate the seed, causing it to germinate. It is also possible to use enzymes or germination enhancers, designed to help seeds open and develop in those first stages.

If you have only saved the seeds for a year and a half, they should not give you any problems. After this time period, even if you have stored them properly, germination may be more complicated because the older the seeds are, the harder their shells, so the water used to open them will take longer to penetrate them. Therefore, the first method to try to get the plant’s embryo to develop is to put your old seeds in a glass of water, with a few drops of hydrogen peroxide, for 24 hours. Hydrogen peroxide softens the shell and facilitates the water’s infiltration.