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are marijuana seeds legal in canada

Only one province or territory has offered clones for sale to their residents thus far. Newfoundland started listing a handful of varieties of clones from Ontario-based cultivator Eve & Co in December 2018, allowing consumers to purchase the plants online through the provincial retailer and having them shipped directly to the consumer from the cultivator.

You see all currently available and/or listed cannabis seeds across Canada below:

Saskatchewan

As the two provinces that have banned home growing of cannabis, Manitoba and Quebec are also not providing any seeds or plants for sale to the public.

Error 404, Muskoka Kush, Pink Lemonade by 34 STREET SEED CO. $49.95

Nova Scotia also currently lists 11 varieties of seeds, although only eight are available at the moment. Two are Tweed’s stand by varieties of Argyle and Bakerstreet at $54.99 for four seeds. The other nine are from Jax at $59.80 for four.

WATCH (Nov. 8, 2018): Know before you grow: Mike Kidd discusses growing pot at home

And the seeds that are available, Bakerstreet and Argyle, were bred for life in a big industrial growing facility, says B.C.-based cannabis breeder Ryan Lee. Canadians growing in their basements, or in a range of outdoor environments in different climates, are all offered the same two plants — at best — from legal sellers.

In Ross’s Toronto-area backyard on a warm fall day, a bee was enjoying the flowers on a basil plant in the sun.

Few home growers seem to get seeds from legal retailers

One online grey-market retailer offers over 50 kinds of feminized seeds (guaranteed female, which means they should produce flowers) and over 80 recommended for outdoor use, sorted by weeks needed to harvest, information you would need to grow outdoors in a cold climate if you wanted your plants to be ready before a hard frost.

Across Canada, the only seeds offered by legal retailers are two indica-dominant varieties from Tweed, which may or may not actually be for sale in any given province.

“It’s very, very limited,” says Brittny Anderson of the Nelson, B.C.-based Cannabis Conservancy. “It’s really problematic.”

Back in the spring, Ross looked at the seed offerings at the government-operated Ontario Cannabis Store, but wasn’t impressed. Like other provincial retailers, the OCS has never stocked more than two varieties, and at the moment has only one.